How Bad Are Bananas?: The carbon footprint of everything (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Profile Books, Dec 9, 2010 - Science - 239 pages
30 Reviews
We always hear the same old green advice ... fly less, turn the thermostat down, drive a hybrid car. But what about all the other things we buy and do? Part green-lifestyle guide, part popular science book, How Bad Are Bananas? is the first book to provide the facts we need to make carbon-savvy purchases and lifestyle decisions. It also helps put things into perspective with entries for the big things (bushfires, volcanic eruptions and the Iraq war) as well as the little things (newspapers, sending a letter, a pint of beer). This book is packed full of surprises - a plastic bag has the smallest footprint of any item listed, while a block of cheese is fairly bad news for the climate - and continuously informs, delights and engages the reader.
  

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Review: How Bad Are Bananas?: The Carbon Footprint Of Everything

User Review  - Laura Myers - Goodreads

This book moves from my bedside table to the kitchen. Sometimes overwhelming, always educational. For those truly interested in the carbon footprint of anything and everything, even our own mortality, this book is a remarkable reference book. Read full review

Review: How Bad Are Bananas?: The Carbon Footprint Of Everything

User Review  - Jim - Goodreads

If you are looking for a page turning narrative, this is not the book for you. For me, this one is best read when you are looking for something to fill a short time as he takes look at the carbon ... Read full review

Contents

A quick guide to carbon and carbon footprints
1
grams
11
to 100 grams
21
grams to 1 kilo
35
kilo to 10 kilos
75
kilos to 100 kilos
105
kilos to 1 tonne
117
tonne to 10 tonnes
131
tonnes to 100 tonnes
141
tonnes to 1 million tonnes
151
million tonnes and beyond
159
More about food
177
Some more information
187
Notes and references
205
Index
229
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

MIKE BERNERS-LEE is the founding director of an associate company of Lancaster University which specialises in organisational responses to climate change.

Bibliographic information