Stigma: Notes on the Management of Spoiled Identity (Google eBook)

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Simon and Schuster, Nov 24, 2009 - Psychology - 168 pages
20 Reviews
From the author of The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life, Stigma is analyzes a person’s feelings about himself and his relationship to people whom society calls “normal.”

Stigma is an illuminating excursion into the situation of persons who are unable to conform to standards that society calls normal. Disqualified from full social acceptance, they are stigmatized individuals. Physically deformed people, ex-mental patients, drug addicts, prostitutes, or those ostracized for other reasons must constantly strive to adjust to their precarious social identities. Their image of themselves must daily confront and be affronted by the image which others reflect back to them.

Drawing extensively on autobiographies and case studies, sociologist Erving Goffman analyzes the stigmatized person’s feelings about himself and his relationship to “normals” He explores the variety of strategies stigmatized individuals employ to deal with the rejection of others, and the complex sorts of information about themselves they project. In Stigma the interplay of alternatives the stigmatized individual must face every day is brilliantly examined by one of America’s leading social analysts.
  

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Review: Stigma: Notes on the Management of Spoiled Identity

User Review  - Kressel Housman - Goodreads

A few weeks ago, a woman who teaches psychology at Breuer's women's seminary spoke at my Shabbos shiur. She spoke about the interplay between status and stigma, particularly in the frum world. A ... Read full review

Review: Stigma: Notes on the Management of Spoiled Identity

User Review  - Askwhy - Goodreads

I have never read a better book in my life. I have never had my mind blown just about continuously reading a book like I've just had. It's so chockfull of insight into human behavior it's not even ... Read full review

Contents

STIGMA AND Socm Iozmm
1
Iuroamxrxon Common AND Pensounr Insmm
73
Gaour Anrcmuzm AND Eco Insurm
114
SELF AND ITS QTIER
130
105
140
Copyright

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Page 2 - Thus, the demands we make might better be called demands made "in effect," and the character we impute to the individual might better be seen as an imputation made in potential retrospect — a characterization "in effect," a virtual social identity. The category and attributes he could in fact be proved to possess will be called his actual social identity. While the stranger is present before us, evidence can arise of his possessing an attribute that makes him different from others in the category...
Page 2 - Society establishes the means of categorizing persons and the complement of attributes felt to be ordinary and natural for members of each of these categories.
Page 7 - The stigmatized individual tends to hold the same beliefs about identity that we do ... the standards he has incorporated from the wider society equip him to be intimately alive to what others see as his failing, inevitably causing him, if only for moments, to agree that he does indeed fall short of what he really ought to be.

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About the author (2009)

Erring Goffman was born in Manville, Alberta (Canada) in 1922. He came to the United States in 1945, and in 1953 received his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. He was professor of sociology at the University of California at Berkeley until 1968, and thereafter was Benjamin Franklin Professor of Anthropology and Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Dr. Goffman received the MacIver Award in 1961 and the In Medias Res Award in 1978. He was a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He died in 1983.

Dr. Goffman's books include The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life, Encounters, Asylums, Behavior in Public Places, Stigma, Interaction Ritual, Strategic Interaction, Relations in Public, Frame Analysis, and Gender Advertisements.

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