The Art of Rhetoric Made Easy (Google eBook)

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A. Parker, 1739 - Rhetoric - 167 pages
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Page 86 - And when we were all fallen to the earth, I heard a voice speaking unto me, and saying in the Hebrew tongue, Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou me? it is hard for thee to kick against the pricks.
Page 82 - Else whence this pleasing hope, this fond desire, This longing after immortality ? Or whence this secret dread and inward horror Of falling into...
Page 52 - O could I flow like thee, and make thy stream My great example, as it is my theme! Though deep, yet clear, though gentle, yet not dull, Strong without rage, without o'er-flowing full.
Page 85 - And now I stand and am judged for the hope of the promise made of God unto our fathers; unto which promise our twelve tribes, instantly serving God day and night, hope to come. For which hope's sake, king Agrippa, I am accused of the Jews.
Page 45 - Delightful task! to rear the tender thought, To teach the young idea how to shoot...
Page 83 - Here will I hold. If there's a power above us And that there is, all nature cries aloud Through all her works He must delight in virtue; And that which He delights in must be happy.
Page 83 - If there's a power above us (And that there is all nature cries aloud, Through all her works), he must delight in virtue ; And that which he delights in must be happy. But when, or where ? this world was made for Caesar.
Page 86 - For these causes the Jews caught me in the temple, and went about to kill me. Having therefore obtained help of God, I continue unto this day, witnessing both to small and great, saying none other things than those which the prophets and Moses did say should come: that Christ should suffer, and that he should be the first that should rise from the dead, and should show light unto the people, and to the Gentiles.
Page 41 - The face of the Lord is against them that do evil, to cut off the remembrance of them from the earth.
Page 22 - In vain he thus attempts her mind to move With tears, and pray'rs, and late-repenting love. Disdainfully she look'd; then turning round, But fix'd her eyes unmov'd upon the ground, And what he says and swears, regards no more Than the deaf rocks, when the loud billows roar; But whirl'd away, to shun his hateful sight, Hid in the forest and the shades of night; Then sought Sichaeus thro' the shady grove, Who answer'd all her cares, and equal'd all her love.

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