The Meaning of Anxiety

Front Cover
W. W. Norton & Company, 1996 - Psychology - 425 pages
5 Reviews
In the revised edition of this now-classic study, the distinguished author of Love and Will deepens his exploration into anxiety theory. Dr. May challenges the idea that mental health means living without anxiety, and he explores anxiety's potential for self-realization as well as ways to avoid its destructive aspects.
  

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Review: The Meaning of Anxiety

User Review  - Natacha Rodrigues - Goodreads

A very usefull overview about anxiety. Read full review

Review: The Meaning of Anxiety

User Review  - Natacha Rodrigues - Goodreads

A very usefull overview about anxiety. Read full review

Contents

V
3
VI
4
VII
9
VIII
11
IX
15
X
16
XI
18
XII
20
LII
194
LIII
196
LIV
199
LV
204
LVI
205
LVII
208
LVIII
216
LIX
220

XIII
26
XIV
29
XV
32
XVI
52
XVII
55
XVIII
57
XIX
60
XX
62
XXI
65
XXII
67
XXIII
70
XXIV
72
XXV
77
XXVI
79
XXVII
81
XXVIII
83
XXIX
86
XXX
96
XXXI
100
XXXII
102
XXXIII
105
XXXIV
109
XXXV
113
XXXVI
117
XXXVII
124
XXXVIII
132
XXXIX
135
XL
140
XLI
144
XLII
149
XLIII
153
XLIV
157
XLV
159
XLVI
166
XLVII
171
XLVIII
174
XLIX
177
L
187
LI
191
LX
223
LXI
226
LXII
230
LXIII
231
LXIV
241
LXV
243
LXVI
245
LXVII
246
LXVIII
259
LXIX
263
LXX
265
LXXI
268
LXXII
281
LXXIII
290
LXXIV
298
LXXV
303
LXXVI
309
LXXVII
315
LXXVIII
320
LXXIX
324
LXXX
326
LXXXI
338
LXXXII
343
LXXXIII
347
LXXXIV
350
LXXXV
355
LXXXVI
358
LXXXVII
361
LXXXVIII
363
LXXXIX
366
XC
368
XCI
374
XCII
381
XCIII
382
XCIV
384
XCV
390
XCVI
397
XCVII
403
Copyright

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References to this book

Human Emotions
Carroll E. Izard
No preview available - 1977
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About the author (1996)

The development of an existential psychology in America is in good part the work of Rollo May. He helped bring existentialism to psychology some fifteen years ago, and since then his impact has increased each year. As he says here, he isn't an existentialist in a cultist sense. In American psychology, the existential approach is part of a wider trend which includes many views" (Eugene T. Gendlin, Psychology Today). May's psychology is sometimes referred to as humanistic. He is one of the affirmative, "third force" American psychologists who are also critical of the society in which we live. Gendlin writes further: "In. . . Psychology and the Human Dilemma [1966], May offers a wealth of valid and stimulating ideas in a totally engaging and readable fashion. [The human dilemma is that] man is always both an active subject and a passive object ". . . May [says]: "Only in knowing ourselves as the determined ones are we free. This last sentence and his many similar discussions seem to mean that we can't help what happens, but only what attitude we take toward what happens. In fact, he means more than this---in taking an attitude toward what happens we change what happens." In late 1968, May was the subject of an article in the New York Times in which he was said to feel that "one sign that the modern age is dying is that its myths are dying." We are at present in a "limbo" between myths---the situation in which people become disoriented and "alienated." "In the new myths," he said, "I would think that racial variation will be seen as a positive value, that emphasis on one world will replace fragmented nationalism, and that things will be valued more for their intrinsic worth rather than in use---what they can be banked for." As a young man, May taught for a period at the American College in Saloniki, Greece. An ordained Congregational minister, May received his Ph.D. at Columbia University in 1949. He worked as supervisory and training analyst at the William Alanson White Institute in New York City and adjunct professor of clinical psychology at the New York University Graduate School of Arts and Sciences for many years. May was instrumental in establishing the Rollo May Center for Humanistic Studies at Saybrook Institute in San Francisco.

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