Havana Nocturne (Google eBook)

Front Cover
HarperCollins, Oct 13, 2009 - True Crime - 432 pages
45 Reviews

To underworld kingpins Meyer Lansky and Charles "Lucky" Luciano, Cuba was the greatest hope for the future of American organized crime in the post-Prohibition years. In the 1950s, the Mob—with the corrupt, repressive government of brutal Cuban dictator Fulgencio Batista in its pocket—owned Havana's biggest luxury hotels and casinos, launching an unprecedented tourism boom complete with the most lavish entertainment, top-drawer celebrities, gorgeous women, and gambling galore. But Mob dreams collided with those of Fidel Castro, Che Guevara, and others who would lead an uprising of the country's disenfranchised against Batista's hated government and its foreign partners—an epic cultural battle that bestselling author T. J. English captures here in all its sexy, decadent, ugly glory.

  

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Review: Havana Nocturne: How the Mob Owned Cuba & Then Lost it to the Revolution

User Review  - Julie - Goodreads

Wow. Now, having said that I will try to give a sense of how great I think this book was without giving too much away. I will start by saying that this was as well-written as it was well-researched ... Read full review

Review: Havana Nocturne: How the Mob Owned Cuba & Then Lost It to the Revolution

User Review  - Andrew Whitaker - Goodreads

Very,very well researched and written book Read full review

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Contents

MOBSTER M A M B
3
THE MArvELoUS JEW
51
LA ENGAñAdORA THE dECEIVER
159
TroPICAL vENgEANCE
226
A HANDMADE WoMAN
247
THE SUN ALMoST rISES
268
gET THE MoNEY
289
EPILogUE
321
APPENDIx
335
SoUrCES
369
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

T.J. English is the New York Times bestselling author of Havana Nocturne, Paddy Whacked, The Westies, and Born to Kill, which was nominated for an Edgar Award. His screenwriting credits include TV episodes of NYPD Blue and Homicide, for which he was awarded the Humanitas Prize. He lives in New York City.

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