the Officer, he was content to take his'owne Worde. Whereupon Tom Dove went presently to Reading, where, upon his Coming, he found all the Rest of the Clothiers lamenting Coles untimely Death, where the woefull Widdow paid him the Money, by which Deed all the Rest of the Clothiers were induced to do Something for Dove. And thereupon one gave him Ten Pounds, another Twenty, another Thirtie pounds, to begin the World anew; and by this Meanes (together with the Blessing of God) he grew into greater Credit then ever hee was before. And Riches being thus come upon him, his former Friends came fawning unto him; and when he had no Neede of them, then everie one was ready to proffer him Kindnesse. His wicked Servants also that disdained him in his Distresse, were after glad to come creeping unto him, intreating with Cap and Knee for his Favour and Friendship. And albeit hee seemed to forgive their Trespasses done against him, yet hee would often say, he would never trust them for a Straw. And thus he ever after lived in great Wealth and Prosperitie, doing much Good to the Poore, and at his Death left to his Children great Lands.

How faire Margaret made her Estate and high Birth knowne to her Master and Dame; & for the intire Love she bore to Duke Robert, made a Vow never to marry, but became a Nun in the Abbey at Glocester.

CHAPTER XV.

How faire Margaret made her Estate and high Birth knowne to her Master and Dame; 6? for the intire Love she bore to Duke Robert, made a Vow never to marry, but became a Nun in the Abbey at Glocester.

AFTER faire Margaret was come againe to Glocester, never did she behold the cleare Day, but with a weeping Eye: and so great was the Sorrow which she conceived for the Losse of Duke Robert, her faithfull Lover, that she utterly despised all the Pleasure of this Life, and at last bewrayed her selfe in this Sort unto her Dame.

O, my good Master and Dame, too long have I dissembled my Parentage from you, whom the froward Destinies doe pursue to deserved Punishment. The wofull Daughter am I of the unhappy Earl of Shrewsburie, who, ever since his Banishment, have done Nothing but drawne Mischance after mee: wherefore let me intreat you (dear Master and

Dame)

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