February 21, 1873; Frederick Vohls', May 13, 1873; Sherwood's, July 7, 1873; John Wilson's, July 26, 1873; Rogers & Doyle's, Ootobera, 1873; and Newham & Williams', April 30, 1874.

February 26, 1845, the State legislature passed an act entitled "An Act to Incorporate the Town of Mt Vernon, in Knox county," the first section reading as follows:

SEC. I. Be it Ordained by the General Assembly of the State i<fOhio, That so much of the town of Mt. Vernon, in the county of Knox, as is comprised in the limits hereinafter described, that is to say, all the in-lots, streets and alleys, and other public grounds bordered by the same, within the old original town plat, and its several recorded and confirmed additions, together with all fractions of lots or parcels of ground lying between the old town plat and either of said additions, especially to include such fractions or portions of ground not already laid out into town lots, as lie between the south line of Hamtramck street, anil the north line of Burgess street, extending between the Hamtramck addition and Norton's addition; and so much of like ground as lies north of the south line of Chestnut street, extending east to the Coshocton road, and to include one tier of in-lols of usual size on the north side of Chestnut street, so extended as aforesaid; also embracing the following grounds— commencing at Lambton square, at the junction of the Mansfield and Wooster roads; thence along the Mansfield road to the intersection of the north line of the cross street or road, to the new graveyard; thence along the north line of said cross street to the graveyard lot; thence north and so running around said graveyard lot and including the school-house lot to the southeast comer thereof; thence following the aforesaid graveyard street to the east line of the Wooster road; thence southward along the east line of the said Wooster road and the east line of Gay street, as extended to North street; thence west to Main or Market street; thence north to the place of beginning, except such lots and streets in any of said plats or additions as have been vacated; Provided, That this exception does not exclude the vacated lots and streets east of Division street, and north of Front street in the Eastern addition, but the same are hereby included in the limits according to the eastern boundary of said addition, as originally laid out and recorded—be, and the same is hereby created into a town corporate, to be known by the name of the town of Mount Vernon; Provided, That all ground here after laid out and recorded as town lots, or additions to said town, by name or otherwise, if contiguous thereto, shall, from the time of being so recorded, be included within the corporate limits of said town and constitute a part thereof.

Further provisions of the above quoted act of incorporation, divided the town into five wards, and allotted one councilman to each ward, and provided for their election, and also for the election of one mayor, one recorder, one town treasurer, one town marshal, and one street commissioner.

Eight years later, by the passage of the following sections, the legislature enabled the town to become a city of the second class:

Sec. Xix. of the municipal code, passed May 3, 1852, provides for the election of two trustees for each ward.

SEC XXI. Any town which by the special act of incorporation has been divided into wards, shall be denominated a city of the second class if the council shall so determine.—Ohio Law, passed 1853.

The completion of the Sandusky, Mansfield & Newark railroad, about 1846, enabled Mount Vernon to take a long step forward, and thus avail itself of the privileges granted by the legislature. The several additions, made to the city in 1873, were caused principally by the completion of the Cleveland, Mount Vernon & Columbus railroad.

On the second of March, 1870. the city council passed "An Ordiance Defining and Establishing the Corporate Limits of the City of Mount Vernon, Ohio." The provision of the ordinance reads as follows:

Sec. 1. Be it ordained by the City Countit of the eity of Mt. Vernon, That the City Corporation Line of the City of Mt. Vernon l>c, and is hereby established by the following described lines, to wit:

Beginning at the southwest corner of the north abutment of the bridge at the south end of Main street, and running thence S. L. 20 50-100 rods along the stone wall south of ]ohn

Cooper's Steam Engine works, to the southeast angle thereof. Thence N. 83^°, E. 5 16-100 rods to the southeast angle of John Cooper's fence, on the west side of Gay street. Thence S. 83'^°, E. 12 40-100 rods to the southwest corner of the Factory addition. Thence by the courses and distances bounding the south side of said addition to the southwest corner of Curtis, and Byer's lot, being lot No. 34 in said addition. Thence N. 83 ", E. 2580-100 rods, continuing along the south line of said addition. Thence N. 74X". E. 32 60-100 rods along said south boundry, and by the same course to a point on the east line of Ridgely street, and near the south line of Water street. Thence N. 20, E. 1 36-100 rods on east line of Ridgely street to a point on the south side of the Springfield, Mt. Vernon and Pittsburgh railroad line. Thence S. 80", E. 38-100 rods to a white oak 28 inches diameter, S. 73a", E. 21 52-100 rods S. 64°, E. 27 16-100 rods along the south side of said railroad line to the centre of Allen Beach's alley. Thence N. i >i0, E. 28-100 rods along the centre of said alley to a point 12 rods south of the south side of Gambier street. Thence S. 73%°, E. 114 40-100 rods on a line parallel with the south side of Gambier street to the east line of Clinton township. Thence N. a°, E. 94 50-100 rods on said township line to the south side of the new Gambier road. Thence N. 88°, W. 37-100 rods along the south side of said road to a point in line with the east side of Centre Run street. Thence N. 2", E. 98-100 rods along the east line of Centre Run street to the centre of Coshocton road. Thence N. 70", E. t4 12-100 rods along the centre of said road to John Flynn's southeast corner. Thence N. 17^°, W. t3 92-100 rods to said Flynn's northeast corner in the the centre of the "Harkness road." Thence N. 88°, 20" W. r66 86-100 rods along the centre of said road to the southeast corner of Mrs. Plimpton's lot, known as ' Round Hill." Thence N. 2", E. 41 90-100 rods along the east side of said lot, to a point in line with the north side of Curtis street. Thence on said line N. 89", W. 43 50-100 rods to the east side of McKenzie street. Thence N. 2°, E. 24 84-100 rods to the south line of land owned by the heirs of Rev. James Scott, deceased. Thence N. 31 E. 36 5.100 rods across said Scott's land, 10 feet north of the stable, and along the northeast side of an alley, across and to to the west side of Wooster road. Thence on the west side of said road N. 40K °, E. 13 40-100 rods to the northeast corner of John McGibney's lot. Thence N. 49^°. W. 1240-100 rods along the north line of said lot, to the northwest corner thereof. Thence N. 88J£°. E. 2650-100 rods along the north side of land owned by John McGibney to the east side of the cemetery. Thence N. 2°, 10', E. 39 80-100 rods on the east side of the cemetery to the northeast corner thereof. Thence N. 88°, 50* W. 18 92-100 rods on the north line of said cemetery to the east line of the Catholic cemetery. Thence on said east line N. 2°, 10' E. 8 60-100 rods to the northeast corner of said cemetery. Thence S. 76^°, W. 43 8-100 rods along the north side or said cemetery and Mr. Pollock's lot, to the west side of the Mansfield road. Thence along the west side of said road N. 14°, W. 2575-100 rods to the south side of a road on the north side of lands owned by widow Trimble's heirs. Thence continuing along the south side of said road S. 76W, W. 39 80-100 rods to the angle thereof. Thence S. 68°, W. 24 rods along the south line of said road, to a point in the line-with Mr. Flaharty's east line. Thence on said east line N. 15^°, W. 12 60-100 rods to said Flaharty's northeast corner. Thence S. 72°, W. 25 84-100 rods along along the north line of Flaharty's lot to the east end of the alley north of the tannery. Thence across the east end of said alley N. 22°, W. 67-100 rods to the north side thereof. Thence S. 72", 11 68-100 rods on the north side ot said alley, and to the west side of Sandusky street. Thence on the west side of said street N. 21°, W. 6 80-100 rods to the northeast corner of John Cassil's lot. Thence on the north side of said lot S. 68W. 60 25-100 rods to the west side of the Baltimore & Ohio railroad. Thence along the west side of said railroad to the north line of Norton's northwestern addition. Thence S. 68Ji", W. 10 rods to the northwest corner of said addition. Thence S. 41%°, E. 25 50-100 rods along the west side of said addition to the west side of said railroad. Thence along the west side of said railroad by the curves and tangents thereof 156 50-100 rods to a point 4 feet w est of the west end of the race bridge abutment and 9 rods north of the north line of Chestnut street. Thence N. 88X", W. 60 23-100 rods through lands of George K. Norton, James Rogers and others to the east line of lands owned by heirs of ]ohn Mitchell, deceased. Thence N. iji", E. 7 20-100. rods on said Mitchell's east line to the northwest corner of said land. Thence N. 890, W. 78 62-100 rods along the north line of said John Mitchell's, Silas Mitchell's John Gotshall's, Sapp and Rogers' land to the northeast corner of lands formerly owned by Samuel Hookaway. Thence S. 1%°, W. 91 62-100 rods along the east line of said land and through lands of Israel and Devin, to a point 8% rods south of the line of Wood street extended. Thence S. 890, E. 115 14-100 rods to the west line of lot No. 10 in Norton's Southern addition. Thence south 20, W. along the west side of lots 10 and 11, 6 35-100 rods to the southwest corner of lot No. ir, the same being on the south line of said southern addition. Thence S. 890, E. 8 rods on the south line of said lot No. 11, to the west side of Norton street. Thence N. 20, E. 8 rods on the west side of said street. Thence S. 890 E. 19 rods along the south side of lots marked "S. Gray'' on city map, to the

west side of the Baltimore & Ohio railroad. Thence S. 58JC, E. 22 rods along the west side of said railroad to a point on the north side of the old race. Thence S. 640, E. 35 48-100 rods along the north side of the old race, to a point from which an elm tree about thirty inches in diameter bears S. 170, W. 64 links distant. Thence S, 7054°, E. 35 rods to the place of beginning.

Sec. 2. That William McClelland, the city solicitor, be and hereby is directed to prosecute the proceedings necessary to effect the annexation contemplated in section first of this ordinance.

Sec. 3. That the foregoing ordinance shall lake effect and be in force from and after its passage and due publication.

In 1830, Mt Vernon contained about five hundred people. The following extracts from a letter written in 1871, by a gentleman now a prominent merchant in Gambier, gives a picture of the town in 1830, as well as some account of the changes in forty years:

In passing down Main street, the other day, I could not but notice the great change that has taken place since I knew the town. I came to Mt. Vernon in 1827, so that by the beginning of 1830, I was pretty well acquainted with the town and the people. The whole make of the ground has been changed, and there are very few buildings now standing (1871) which were then (1830) in existence, or if standing, have been moved to other streets. Commencing at the upper end of Main street on the east side, there is yet standing what was then the residence of H. B. Curtis, esq., now occupied by him as an office, and formerly by the Knox County National bank. North of this until you get above what was then a deep valley, there is not a vestige of the town of 1830 now standing. Above where this valley then was, stood a brick house now owned, the writer thinks, by Mr. B. F. Criswell.

The next building south of H. B. Curtis', then standing, is now owned by Samuel Israel, esq., and then the residence and mercantile establishment of Dr. Timothy Burr. South of this until you get below Gambier street, there is not a single building now standing that was then in existence. Passing the George building, now occupied by Armstrong & Miller, on the corner of Main and Gambier streets, there are two or three old acquaintances, but so dressed up they are scarcely recognizable. The brick now occupied by Samuel Clark, known as the Jacob Martin house, the writer thinks was then in existence. From this to the bridge he sees no old acquaintance.

Passing to the west side of Main street, let us go north of the valley before spoken of. Here is found a part of a brick dwelling that has been added to and remodelled, built, the writer thinks, by William Watkins. The story was, that said Watkins having broken his leg, was prevented from going out to work, and not knowing what to do w ith himself until his leg got well, conceived the idea of laying up the walls of a house. By the assistance of his wife and neighbors, he was helped to the spot every morning, where he sat and laid brick all day, his wife tending mason.

South from this until you come to the building occupied by J. Stauffer & Son, the old town has all been swept away. This building was then occupied by Hugh Newell as a hotel. It was one of the notables of the town.

Passing down the street nothing of old acquaintance is seen until we get below Woodward block. There we come across a little group of frame houses, two or three in number.

The next old acquaintance that strikes the eye is the building at the southwest comer of Main and Gambier streets—Potwin's Phoenbt building—looking all the better for having been purged by fire. It was in 1830 one of the "institutions" of the town, known as The Golden Swan Inn, kept by Thomas Irvine. Here the county courts were held. Here in the west wing, up stairs, was the hall of the Thespian society. From this to the bridge there is nothing standing of the buildings of 1830.

Let us retnrn to the north end of Main street, and note some of the then buildings and their uses:

The Whig paper was then published by William Bevans in a little one-story red frame, where Mrs. Dr. Thompson now resides. The next building south was the residence of H. B. Curtis, before mentioned. On the corner where Dr. J.J. Scribner's drug store now is, was a frame house, the residence of William Y. Farquhar, then treasurer of Knox county. Next, the residence of Dr. Timothy Burr, before noted. Next, south on the corner stood a little one-story frame, the office of Dr. Maxwell. Back of this, fronting the public square, was the small brick residence of P. L. Norton. On the site of those old buildings stands the Norton block—the corner room occupied by Dr. Israel Green as a drug store, and the upper story by offices of the Cleveland, Mt. Vernon & Columbus railroad. On the next corner, now occupied by the Knox County National bank, in the "Curtis house" block, was a brick building occupied by Oilman Bryant as a store. But before crossing the public square, I should have noticed on a bank, at least twenty feet above Main street, at the southeast corner of Main and High streets, was a large pile of brick and nearly three sides of a wall of what used to be the court house. (I might mention here in passing that a new court house was under contract, and was afterwards built on the northwest corner of Main and High streets.) Another feature which should not be omitted. On the north side of High street, and a short distance east from Main, stood a building whose iron grated windows and gloomy aspect, told all persons travelling through the town that the building was intended to be a warning to evil doers, and was put in a conspicuous place that all might see and order their steps accordingly.

From Bryant s corner south the next building was a brick occupied by Sherman & Browning as a store. Next was a small one-story frame occupied as a shoe shop and law office. Next stood a large frame, occupied by Eli Miller as a residence and store, in which was the post office, Mr. Miller being then postmaster. On the southeast corner of Main and Vine streets, was a fram£ building occupied by S. J. Updegraff as a store. That frame was moved off, and now forms a part of the residence of Daniel McDowell, esq., and on its site is the Ward block. Next, a frame building in which Mr. James Huntsberry kept a saloon (grocery it was then called). After this came the tailor shop of Adam Pyle. The Democratic paper was published near here. Next, where the Odd Fellows' building now stands, occupied by C. A. Bope's hardware store, was a two-story frame hotel and stage house, kept by Calvin Anderson. Next, two or three small frames, in which were J. W. Warden's law office, Dr. J. N. Bun's office, John Gregg's harness shop, and a drug shop, the proprietor's name not now remembered, also the residence of Isaac Vore. Next to this, where the Peterman building now stands, was a hewed log building, weather boarded, occupied by S. Rowley as a tavern, and was familiarly

known as "the old war office." On the southeast corner of Main and Gambier streets was a two-story frame building occupied by William E. Davidson as a tavern. Then follows Silers' residence and hat shop. Charles Sager, Jacob and Joseph Martin, and some others not now remembered.

On the west side of Main street where N. N. Hill resides was a two-story frame occupied by William Mefford. Next south on the ground now occupied by the fine residence of Hon. Joseph C. Devin, was a long one-story red frame building used as county offices.

On the southwest corner of Mam and Chestnut streets, was a small frame house used as a bakery by William Mackey. Next a two-story frame occupied by Dr. J. W. Russell, and as a select school. The second story became the hall of the Mount Vernon Lyceum. This building, like many of early days, became a traveller, but cast anchor, 1 believe, on the south side of Gambier street, near Main.

The next building was Washington Hall, a hotel, kept by Hugh Newell, before spoken of.

Crossing the public square, the corner now known as the Kirk Opera House block, and occupied by Stadler the clothier, and Van Aikin's boot and shoe store, was covered by a twostory frame, the residence of J. B. Rogers, and the mercantile establishment of J. B. Rogers & Co. West of this building and fronting to the north, were two or three small frames, in one of which T. W. Rogers kept military goods, and in another D. D. Stevenson kept a shoe shop. In their places are now the fine business houses built by Raymond and Sperry. Next south of J. B. Roger's store was a small frame building on the ground now covered by the store of J. S. Ringwalt. Next to this, where James Rogers' hardware store now is, stood a small one-story frame, occupied by Anthony Banning, jr., as a store. This was formerly the building occupied by the Owl Creek bank. It had a double batton door and window shutters filled with nails, "burglar proof." The paint, which was nearly gone, had been red. Next to this, on the corner, was a twostory brick, occupied by James S. Banning as a store and residence.

Where the Woodward block now stands was a two-story frame, the store of A. & S. Elliott. Next to this stood a frame occupied by P. L. Norton as a store. Jacob Banning's store came next. These two last named buildings can still be seen. Then came Zimmerman's tavern, a good sized wooden building, two-story front with a wing in the rear. Next, the residence of R. M. Brown, a little back from the street. The site of these two last named buildings is now occupied by the large threestory brick edifice built by R. M. Brown, and occupied as places of business by Browning & Sperry, T. B. Mead, and W. B. Russell's drug store. Next the residence of Mr. Brown, on the corner, was a brick, the residence and business place of J. E. Woodbridge.

Just across the street was the "Golden Swan Inn," before spoken of. The building is now occupied on the ground floor by the dry goods store of H. C. Swetland, and the drug store of Baker Brothers, and the second story by the Democratic Banner newspaper and job office. Next to the Golden Swan came a small frame or two, and then another tavern almost on the bank of the creek.

One more business establishment I will mention, and then be done with the west side of Main street. This was Morey's soap factory, on the bank of the stream, and a little west of the street. It was here that mischievous men and boys sent strangers and others not posted for any article not found at any of the stores. If butter was scarce, and a person seen walking up and down street with a plate in his hand, he was told Morey had plenty. So from a needle to an anchor, it mattered little what was wanted, they were sent to Moiey. The latter was considerably bored by these practical jokes, but yet not quite so badly bored as those who were sent there.

The places for public worship then were few. The Presbyterian church stood on the site of the present fine edifice. It was a low, square, four-roofed brick, covering quite a space of ground, and capable of holding several hundred people. It passed away long ago. Its successor, a large frame building, was burned, and now the third building occupies the ground. The building then occupied by the Methodists was standing until a few months since, and in 1830 was also used as the Fifth ward school-house. Its upper story was then used as a Masonic lodge.

In the early part of 1880, this old landmark was razed to the ground, to make place for the residence of William R. Brown, the present mayor of the city.

Another school-house in the southwest part of the town was frequently used for preaching.

The above comprises all the places then used for public worship known to the writer. Elder Rigdon did occasionally preach in his own house, west end of Chestnut street.

Of the persons then living the majority have passed away. Of the members of the bar the writer knows of only one representative, the Honorable H. B. Curtis; of the clergy none. Of the medical fraternity, Drs. J. N. Burr and J. W. Russell.

Mt. Vernon in 1830 claimed no less than eighteen merchants. All have passed from earth, the late J. li. Woodbridge being the last of the old timers who was called away.

Of the list of young men and boys then acting in the capacity of clerks in the various stores in 1830, only eight were living in 1871, viz: V. W. Miller, now of Newark, Ohio, then with Sherman & Browning; G. B. Burr, now of Texas, then with his father, Dr. T. Burr; George \V. Martin, then with A. & S. Elliott, now of Lancaster, Ohio; Milo Lewis, then with D. S. Norton, near the mills, now of Washington city; C. G. Scott, then with Philo L Norton, now of Gambier; P. Jones, then with S. J. Updegraph, now of Coshocton county, Ohio. N. N. Hill came that year with S. P. Warden; Mr. Hill clerked for Samuel Mott, and Mr. Warden for A. & S. Elliott. Mr. Warden resides in Athens county, and Mr. Hill in Mt. Vernon, being the only one of the eight, who is a resident of the city in 1880.

Of the different trades and occupations but few can be named who are now living. In the shoe business in 1830, were Isaac Hadley and James Hutchinson. Mr. Hutchinson is still in the busi

ness, while Mr. Hadley lives a retired life. In the tailoring business Adam Pyle and William Pettigrew are the only ones named by the above writer. Mr. Pyle is dead. Joseph Martin, now living, is the cabinetmaker named. Of hatters, the names of none are mentioned, although he says there were a. number in 1830. Of tanners, none; of chairmakers, one, Daniel McDowell, still living, but not in the cabinet business; of bakers, S. A. Mackey is living: of gunmakers, none are living; of saddlers and harnessmakers, no names are mentioned; of silversmiths, J. B. Brown was then the only one, and he long since passed away. His son and successor was not then born.

Of the change in the surface of the ground, a few particulars may be mentioned. The public square then was sadly turned up tow ards the setting sun. On the east side of Main street it has been taken off about twenty feet, while on the west side where the new cistern has been recently put in, it has been filled up fully fifteen feet. A summer or two ago when Mr. Wolff was digging a pit for coal, north of his fine block, the workmen cut through no less than three distinct side walks, the first one being met not less than three feet below the surface. When Gilman Bryant built the market house in 1832, his contract to fill in twelve feet before he laid the pavement.

High street from a point east of the court house, has been cut down all the way to Main, and from Main street west it has been filled up. Notice the brick house south nearly opposite the present court house. It had a stone story .put under it since 1830.

That brick house is now a thing of the past A new and beautiful Baptist church is soon to be erected on its site.

Main street north from Chestnut, had been cut through a hill to the valley previously mentioned This valley running east and west, is now nearly filled.

CHAPTER XL.

MOUNT VERNON—CONTINUED.

List Of Municipal Officers—The Press Of Mount VerNonPublic Schools.

THE town of Mount Vernon was incorporated February 22,183c, and placed under the government of a mayor, recorder, and a board of trustees, now better known as the common council. Of the government of the village and town prior to 1830, no records can be found.

From 1830 up to April, 1880, the following were elected to the different borough, town, and city offices, and includes the names of all elected during that time except for during the years between 1835 and 1845, when the records were lost or mislaid. This loss, for the sake of a continuous history, is much to be regretted.

1830— Samuel Molt, mayor; Johnston Elliott, recorder; Jonas Ward, James Martin, Marvin Tracy, Gilman Bryant, Daniel McFarland, council.

1831— William P. Burgess, mayor; Marvin Tracy, recorder; G. B. Maxfield, J. N. Burr, J. E. Woodbridge, ). W. Forrest, Adam Glaze, jr., council.

1832— William P. Burgess, mayor; S. W. Hildreth, recorder; William Y. Farquhar, Richard House, John Dwyer, Jacob Siler, John S. Roberts, council.

1833— S. W. Hildreth, mayor; T. W. Rogers, recorder; John Sherman, Hugh Neal, Jacob Martin, Timothy Colopry, Luther Freeman, coancil.

1834— John W. Warden, mayor; S. Wf. Farquhar, recorder; Alexander Elliott, G. Zimmerman, Jacob Andrews, Hught Bartleu, Daniel McFarland, council.

1835— S. W. Hildreth, mayor; S. W. Farquhar, recorder; Jacob Andrews, Johnston Elliott, Eli Miller, Jonathan Beach, Hugh Oglevee, members of council. .....

The act incorporating the town of Mt. Vernon, divides the town into wards, and allots one councilman to each ward, and provides for the election of other town officers, viz: one treasurer, one marshall, and one street commissioner.

1845— Isaac Davis, mayor; James Smith, jr., recorder; first ward, Johnson Elliott; second ward, Job Evans; third ward, Kollin C. Hurd; fourth ward, Henry B. Curtis; fifth ward, Charles Cooper, members of council; Alexander C. Elliott, treasurer; Charles L. Bennet. marshal; James L. Young, street ,commissioner.

1846— Jacob B. Brown, mayor; James Smith, jr., recorder; first, James E. Woodbridge; second, Hugh Oglevee; third, Rollin C. Hurd; fourth, Sewell Gray; fifth, Hosmer Curtis, members of council; Alexander C. Elliott, treasurer; Clark L. Bennett, marshal; James L. Young, street commissioner.

1847—Jacob B. Brown, mayor; James Smith, jr., recorder; first, James Relf; second, N. N. Hill; third, W. R, Sapp; fourth, Sewell Gray; fifth, Daniel Axtell, members of council; Alexander C. Elliott, treasurer; Clark L. Bennett, marshal; Adam Glaze, jr., street commissioner.

1848— C. P. Buckingham, mayor; James Smith, jr., recorder; first, James Lafever; second, H. McFarland; third, D. Clark, fourth, Horatio L. Miller; fifth, Daniel Axtell, members of council; Alexander C. Elliott, treasurer; Clark L. Bennett, marshal; Johnson Elliott, street commissioner.

1849— Joseph S. Davis, mayor; James Smith, jr., recorder; first, Benjamin Giles; second, Henry W. Ball; third, D. Clark; fourth. Horatio S. Miller; fifth, Charles Cooper, members of council; Alexander C. Elliott, treasurer; Abraham Einmett, marshal; David Morton, street commissioner.

1850— Joseph S. Davis, mayor; James Smith, jr., recorder; first, Benjamin Giles; second, John Miller; third, A. Ban.

Norton; fourth, John A. Norton; fifth, Charles Cooper, members of council; Alexander C. Elliott, treasurer; Joseph S. Martin, marshal; one street commissioner elected by each ward; one police officer elected by each ward.

1851— Joseph S. Davis, mayor; James Smith, jr., recorder; first, Benjamin Giles; second, Merrett M. Beam; third, A. Banning Norton; fourth, Sewell Gray; fifth, Thomas Evans, members of council; Alexander C. Elliott, treasurer; Russell Crandall, marshal; one street commissioner elected by each ward; one police officer elected by each ward.

1852— Joseph W. Vance, mayor; James Smith, Jr., recorder; first, Benjamin Giles; second, Milton L. Mills; third, Charles

G. Bryant; fourth Nathaniel McGiffin; fifth, Casper Fordney, members of council; Alexander C. Eliott, treasurer; Squire McDonald, marshal; one street commissioner elected by each ward; one police officer elected by each ward.

r853—E. S. S. Rouse, mayor; James Smith, jr., recorder; first, Samuel Davis; second, J. H. McFarland; third, G. B. White; fourth, William M. Mefford; fifth, Casper Fordney, members of council; Alexander C. Elliott, treasurer; Jacob Capel, marshal; one street commissioner elected by each ward; one police officer elected by each ward.

1854— Jacob B. Brown, mayor, died September r, 1854; James Smith, jr., city solicitor; Alexander C. Elliott, treasurer;

H. K. Robinson, marshal; (two from each ward) first, Samuel Davis two years, A. A. Stoughton one year; second. Job Evans two years, E. S. S. Rouse, jr., one year; third, John W. White two years, George B. White one year; fourth, Benjamin B. Lippitt two years, W. M. MefTord one year; fifth, Joseph Gardiner two years, Oisper Fordney one year, members of council; one street commissioner elected by each ward; one police officer elected by each ward; Joseph S. Davis, city clerk, elected by council.

1855— Thomas Cooper, mayor; James Smith, jr., city solicitor; Alexander C. Elliott, treasurer; H. K. Robinson, marshal; first, A. N. Stoughton; second, William Sanderson Sr.; third George B. White; fourth, W. M. MefTord; fifth, David Martin one year, Joseph Scarbrough two years, members of council; one street commissioner elected by each ward; one police officer elected by each ward; Joseph S. Davis, city clerk, elected by council.

1856— Thompson Cooper, mayor; William McClelland, city solicitor; Alexander C. Elliott, treasurer; Thomas S. Jacobs, marshal; John People, street commissioner; first, George W. Hank; second, Job Evans; third S. W. Farquhar; fourth, Joseph Mahaffey; fifth, Dennis Smith one year, Joseph Wolf two years, members of council; Joseph S. Dav'.s, city clerk, elected by council.

1857— George W. Steele, marshal; Alexander C. Elliott, treasurer; Frederick Rumpus, street commissioner; Samuel Israel, J. H. McFarland, board of education; first, Benjamin Giles; second, W. M. Bunn; third, George B. White; fourth, Nathaniel McGiffin; fiith Dennis Smith, members of council; Joseph S. Davis, city clerk, elected by council.

1858— Thompson Cooper, mayor; Charles B. Church, marshal; William McClelland, city solicitor; Alexander C. Elliott, treasurer; Russell Crandall, street commissioner; Edward Calkins, S. L. Taylor, board of education; first, Jonathan Graff; second, Job Evans; third, John W. White; fourth, B. B. Lippitt; fifth, John H. Roberts, members of council; Joseph S. Davis, city clerk, elected by council.

1859— Ephrain Hogle, marshal; Alexander C. Elliott, treas

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