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" O, for my sake do you with Fortune chide, The guilty goddess of my harmful deeds, That did not better for my life provide Than public means which public manners breeds. Thence comes it that my name receives a brand, And almost thence my nature is subdued... "
The Plays and Poems of William Shakspeare: In Ten Volumes: Collated Verbatim ... - Page 279
by William Shakespeare, Edmond Malone, Samuel Johnson, George Steevens, Alexander Pope, Nicholas Rowe - 1790
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The Sonnets: Poems of Love

William Shakespeare, William Burto - Drama - 1980 - 154 pages
...A god in love, to whom I am confined. Vx, for my sake do you with Fortune chide, The guilty goddess of my harmful deeds, That did not better for my life provide Than public means which public manners breeds. Thence comes it that my name receives a brand, And almost...
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Shakespeare the Craftsman: Volume 5: The Clark Lectures 1968

M. C. Bradbrook - Drama - 1979 - 187 pages
...choice, it was undoubtedly a wise one. Oh, for my sake do you with Fortune chide, The guilty goddess of my harmful deeds, That did not better for my life provide Than public means, which public manners breeds. Thence comes it that my name receives a brand, And almost...
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Romantic Critical Essays

David Bromwich - Literary Criticism - 1987 - 269 pages
...alludes to his profession as a player:Oh for my sake do you with Fortune chide, The guilty goddess of my harmful deeds, That did not better for my life provide Than public means which public custom breeds Thence comes it that my name receives a brand; And almost thence...
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Complete Sonnets

William Shakespeare - Poetry - 1991 - 74 pages
Over 150 exquisite poems deal with love, friendship, the tyranny of time, beauty's evanescence, death, and other themes in language unsurpassed in passion, precision ...
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Sonetti

William Shakespeare - Poetry - 1992 - 212 pages
...benevolmente al tuo puro, amorosissimo seno. O for my sake do you with Portune chide, The guilty goddess of my harmful deeds, That did not better for my life provide, Than public means which public manners breeds. Thence comes it that my name receives a brand, 5 And cdmost...
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Shakespeare the Actor and the Purposes of Playing

Meredith Anne Skura - Drama - 1994 - 325 pages
For the Renaissance, all the world may have been a stage and all its people players, but Shakespeare was also an actor on the literal stage. Meredith Anne Skura asks what it ...
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The Poems and Sonnets of William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - Poetry - 1994 - 197 pages
...pure and most most loving breast. 111 O, for my sake do you with Fortune chide, The guilty goddess of my harmful deeds, That did not better for my life provide Than public means which public manners breeds. Thence comes it that my name receives a brand; And almost...
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Shakespeare's Sonnets

William Shakespeare - Sonnets, English - 1963 - 182 pages
...endeavours, artistic achievement, or intentions. O, for my sake do you with fortune chide, The guilty goddess of my harmful deeds, That did not better for my life provide Than public means which public manners breeds. 5 Thence comes it that my name receives a brand, And almost...
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Shakespeare's Theory of Drama

Pauline Kiernan - Drama - 1998 - 218 pages
...encouraged the plausibility of this view: Oh, for my sake do you with Fortune chide, The guilty goddess of my harmful deeds, That did not better for my life provide Than public means which public manners breeds. Thence comes it that my name receives a brand, And almost...
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The British Idealists

David Boucher - History - 1997 - 304 pages
...knows that the 1 Shakespeare, Sonnet i11. O, for my sake do you with Fortune chide, The guilty goddess of my harmful deeds, That did not better for my life provide Than public means which public manners breeds, And almost thence my nature is subdued To what it works in,...
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