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Books Books 11 - 20 of 173 on What years, i' faith ? Vio. About your years, my lord. Duke. Too old, by heaven;....  
" What years, i' faith ? Vio. About your years, my lord. Duke. Too old, by heaven; let still the woman take An elder than herself ; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are... "
Shakespeariana - Page 356
edited by - 1887
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The Plays of William Shakspeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare, George Steevens - Drama - 1811
...the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart, For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering, sooner lost and worn, Than women's are. Vio. I think it well, my lord....
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The plays of William Shakspeare, pr. from the text of the corrected copy ...

William Shakespeare - 1811
...the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him. So sways she level in her husband's heart, For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and un6rn», More longing, wavering, sooner lost and worn, Than women's are. t in. I think it well, my...
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The Works of William Shakespeare: In Nine Volumes, Volume 3

William Shakespeare, Samuel Johnson, George Steevens - Drama - 1810
...woman take An elder than herself ; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering, sooner lost and worn, Than women's are. Vio. I think it well, my lord....
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The Plays of William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare, Isaac Reed - 1813 - 913 pages
...woman take An elder tha.i IK rself: so wears she to him. So sways she level in her liusbaitd's heart. For, boy. however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm. More longing, wavering, sooner lout and worn, Than women's arc. Via. I think it well, my lord....
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The dramatic works of William Shakspeare. Whittingham's ed

William Shakespeare - 1814
...the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unh'riu, More longing, wavering, sooner lost and worn, Than women s are. Vio. I think it well, my lord....
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The Family Shakspeare: In Ten Volumes; in which Nothing is Added ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare, Thomas Bowdler - Drama - 1818 - 36 pages
...the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering, sooner lost and worn, Than women's are. Vio. I think it well, my lord....
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare: To which are Added His ...

William Shakespeare - History - 1821
...the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and uumin, More longing, wavering, sooner lost and worn, Than women's are. Vio. I think it well, my lord....
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Scenes at Brighton; or, 'How much?'.

Innes Hoole - 1821
...high for the purchase. CHAPCHAPTER IV. Her face was sorrowful, but sure More beautiful fur sorrow. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and infirm, More longing, wavering, sooner lost and won, Than women's are. SHAKESPEARE. men may say more,...
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The Plays of William Shakspeare, Volume 1

William Shakespeare, George Steevens - Drama - 1822
...the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart, For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unarm. More longing, wavering, sooner tost and worn, Than women's are. Via. I think it well, my lord....
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare, in Ten Volumes: All's well that ...

William Shakespeare, Isaac Reed, Samuel Johnson, George Steevens - 1823
...the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering, sooner lost and worn, Than women's are. Vio. I think it well, my lord....
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