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Books Books 71 - 80 of 176 on What years, i' faith ? Vio. About your years, my lord. Duke. Too old, by heaven;....  
" What years, i' faith ? Vio. About your years, my lord. Duke. Too old, by heaven; let still the woman take An elder than herself ; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are... "
Shakespeariana - Page 356
edited by - 1887
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The Rambler, a Catholic journal of home and foreign literature [&c.]. Vol.5 ...

1854
...nothing more marked in the great poet. Who remembers not the melting pathos of the words of Viola : " For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering, sooner lost and worn, Than women's are. Viola. I think it well, my...
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The works of William Shakspere. Knight's Cabinet ed., with additional notes

William Shakespeare - 1856
...than herself; so wears she to him. So sways she level in her husband's heart." And wherefore? " For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering, sooner lost and worn, Than womeu's are." reference only to his own...
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Woman the glory of the man

Joseph Watts Lethbridge - 1856
...tone and the true feeling to th,e touches of womanly sentiment. CHAPTER II. INTELLECTUAL CAPACITY. " For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wandering, sooner lost and won, Than women's are." Sttakspere. To discriminate...
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A Collection of Familiar Quotations: With Complete Indices of Authors and ...

John Bartlett - Quotations - 1856 - 358 pages
...the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering, sooner lost and worn, Than women's are. Act ii. Sc. 4. She never told...
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Shakspearian Reader: A Collection of the Most Approved Plays of Shakspeare ...

William Shakespeare - 1857 - 469 pages
...woman take <\.n elder than herself ; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering, sooner lost and worn, Than women's are. Via. I think it well, my lord....
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The Complete Works of Shakspeare, Revised from the Best ..., Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1857
...elder than herself; so wears she to him, ACT H. SCENE IV. So sways she level in her hushand's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering, sooner lost and worn, Than women's are. Via. I think it well, my lord....
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The philosophy of William Shakespeare delineating in seven hundred and fifty ...

William Shakespeare - 1857
...woman take An elder than herself ; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and.unfirm, More longing, wavering, sooner lost and worn, Than women's are. Vio. I think it well, my...
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Shakespeare's Comedies, Histories, Tragedies, and Poems, Volume 2

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1858
...woman take An elder than herself ; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart : For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfinn, More longing, wavering, sooner lost and won *, Than women's are. Vio. I think it well, my lord....
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The Plays of Shakespeare with the Poems, Volume 2

William Shakespeare, Howard Staunton - 1859
...employs tha word in a aouble sense. ACT It.] [SCENE iv. So sways she level in her husband's heart : For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and tinfirm, More longing, wavering, sooner lost and worn," Than women's are. Vio. I think it well, my...
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Tales from Shakspere: For the Use of Young Persons

Charles Lamb, Charles Knight - Drama - 1859 - 503 pages
...the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and uufirm, More longing, wavering, sooner lost and worn, Than women's are. Vio, I think it well, my lord....
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