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" The crow doth sing as sweetly as the lark When neither is attended ; and, I think, The nightingale, if she should sing by day, When every goose is cackling, would be thought No better a musician than the wren. "
The Merchant of Venice
by William Shakespeare
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An Encyclopedia of Quotations about Music

Nat Shapiro - Music - 1981 - 418 pages
...the Shrew, 1593-94 The crow doth sing as sweetly as the lark, When neither is attended; and I think, The nightingale, if she should sing by day, When every...would be thought No better a musician than the wren. William Shakespeare The Merchant of "Venice, 1596-97 I do but sing because I must, And pipe but as...
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Shakespeare & the Uses of Comedy

Joseph Allen Bryant - Literary Criticism
...on it, madam. Por. The crow doth sing as sweetly as the lark When neither is attended; and I think The nightingale, if she should sing by day When every...musician than the wren. How many things by season season 'd are To their right praise and true perfection! [Vi89-108] Part of what Portia is saying here...
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Sources of the Self: The Making of the Modern Identity

Charles Taylor - Philosophy - 1992 - 613 pages
...cunning of our poet is in the discreet using of his figures"; or this, from the Merchant of Venice: How many things by season season'd are To their right praise and true perfection!7 (5.1.108-109) It would be misleading to speak, as I began to above, of the valuation being...
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Shakespeare's Speaking Properties

Frances N. Teague - Literary Criticism - 1991 - 222 pages
...mercy in the harsh courtroom. A few lines later Portia says: Nothing is good, I see, without respect. How many things by season season'd are To their right praise and true perfection! Peace! (5.1.99, 107-9) The candle tempers the darkness of the night and makes the music of Belmont sweeter,...
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Shakespeare's Comic Commonwealths

Camille Wells Slights - Literary Criticism - 1993 - 290 pages
...explains to Nerissa: The crow doth sing as sweetly as the lark When neither is attended; and I think The nightingale, if she should sing by day When every...would be thought No better a musician than the wren. (Vi102-6)18 Bassanio needs to learn to distinguish among the confusing and conflicting claims on his...
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Companion to the Calendar: A Guide to the Saints and Mysteries of the ...

Mary Ellen Hynes - Christain saints - 1993 - 210 pages
...United States of America. 10 09 08 07 06 98765 ISBN-10: 1-56854-011-6 ISBN-13: 978-1-56854-011-5 COMCAL How many things by season season'd are to their right praise and true perfection! William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice (Act v, Scene I) Contents v Foreword by Ade Bethune...
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Birds in Literature

Leonard Lutwack - Literary Collections - 1994 - 286 pages
...consequently made a deeper impression on listeners, as Shakespeare points out in The Merchant of Venice: The nightingale, if she should sing by day When every goose is cackling, would be thought No better musician than the wren. (5.1.104-6) The reputation of the nightingale in literature has served to reinforce...
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The Merchant of Venice

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1995 - 88 pages
...on it, madam. POR. The crow doth sing as sweetly as the lark, When neither is attended; and I think The nightingale, if she should sing by day, When every...and true perfection! Peace, ho! the moon sleeps with Endymion,5 And would not be awaked. [MusIc ceases.} 1. Erebus] Tartarus, hell. 4. without respect]...
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Passion Made Public: Elizabethan Lyric, Gender, and Performance

Diana E. Henderson - Literary Criticism - 1995 - 279 pages
...ceases.]" (108-9). Having just honored the aptness of nightingale music by night but not day, noting that "things by season season'd are / To their right praise and true perfection," Portia's speech confirms Shakespeare's active participation in the division of the spheres, astrological...
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The Complete Works of William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1996 - 1263 pages
...it, madam. PORTIA. The crow doth sing as sweetly as the lark, When neither is attended; and I think Exeter, We will aboard to-night. Why, how now,...complexion? Look ye, how they change! Their cheeks r heir right praise and true perfection! Peace, ho! the moon sleeps with Endymion, And would not...
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