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Books Books 41 - 50 of 184 on to useful purposes, should be honoured and encouraged, wherever it is found. This....  
" to useful purposes, should be honoured and encouraged, wherever it is found. This divine power, “without which judgment is cold and knowledge is inert ; that energy, which collects, combines, amplifies and animates,” whether possessed by a poet, who,... "
Mechanicks Magazine, and Journal of Publick Internal Improvement - Page 5
1830
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Memoirs of John Dryden

Sir Walter Scott - 1826 - 277 pages
...scythe, and levelled by the roller. "Of genius, that power which constitutes a poet; that quality, without which judgment is cold, and knowledge is inert;...which collects, combines, amplifies, and animates; the superiority must, with some hesitation, be allowed to Dryden. It is not to be inferred, that of...
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The miscellaneous prose works of sir Walter Scott

sir Walter Scott (bart [prose, collected]) - 1827
...scythe, and levelled by the roller. " Of genius, that power which constitutes a poet; that quality, without which judgment is cold, and knowledge is inert;...which collects, combines, amplifies, and animates ; the superiority must, with some hesitation, be allowed to Dryden. It is not to be inferred, that...
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The Monthly Review

Ralph Griffiths, George Edward Griffiths - 1827
...the poem. With genius—" that power," says Doctor Johnson, " which constitutes a poet; that quality, without which judgment is cold, and knowledge is inert";...that energy which collects, combines, amplifies, and animates,"—Ariosto was pre-eminently gifted. On this account, notwithstanding all his wildness and...
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Historical sketch of the origin of English prose literature, and of its ...

William Gray - 1828
...from the sonorous and latinized Johnson. Of genius, that power which constitutes a poet; that quality without which judgment is cold, and knowledge is inert;...which collects, combines, amplifies, and animates; the superiority must, with some hesitation, be allowed to Dryden. It is not to be inferred that of...
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Lessons in Elocution: Or, A Selection of Pieces in Prose and Verse, for the ...

William Scott - Elocution - 1829 - 407 pages
...the sythe, and levelled by the roller. Of genius—that power that constitutes a poet; that quality, without which judgment is cold and knowledge is inert;...that energy which collects, combines, amplifies and animates—the superiority must, with some hesitation. be allowed to Dryden. It is not to be inferred,...
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The poetical works of Alexander Pope, Esq: to which is prefixed the life of ...

Alexander Pope, Homer, Samuel Johnson - 1830 - 442 pages
...the scythe, and levelled by the roller. Of genius, that power which constitutes a poet; that quality without which judgment is cold, and knowledge is inert;...which collects, combines, amplifies, and animates, the superiority must, with some hesitation, be allowed to Dryden. It is not to be inferred, that of...
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Chambers's Cyclopædia of English Literature: A History ..., Volumes 3-4

Robert Carruthers - English language - 1830
...roller. Of genius, that power which constitutes a poet, that quality without which judgment is »old and knowledge is inert, that energy which collects, combines, amplifies, and animates, the superiority must, with some hesitation, be allowed to Dryden. It is not to be inferred, that of...
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The American First Class Book, Or, Exercises in Reading and Recitation ...

John Pierpont - Readers - 1831 - 480 pages
...by the roller. Of genius, that power which constitutes a poet; that quality without which judgement is cold, and knowledge is inert; that energy which collects, combines, amplifies, and animates ; the superiority must, with some hesitation, be allowed to Drvden. It is not to be inferred, that...
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The life of John Dryden

Sir Walter Scott - Literary Criticism - 1834 - 453 pages
...it."—TOKSON—Spenct'l Anecdotes, (Malune,) p. 114.] " Of genius, that power which constitutes a poet; that quality, without which judgment is cold, and knowledge is inert...which collects, combines, amplifies, and animates; the superiority must, with some hesitation, be allowed to Dryden. It is not tobe inferred, that of...
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The Foreign Quarterly Review, Volume 14

Art - 1834
...striking quality in nature." Johnson speaks of it, as " that power which constitutes a poet, that quality, without which judgment is cold, and knowledge is inert;...which collects, combines, amplifies, and animates." We leave the reader to make his choice between the four, avowing that we ourselves are not satisfied...
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