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Books Books 41 - 50 of 184 on Why, well; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now; and I feel....  
" Why, well; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now; and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience. "
The Plays of William Shakspeare: In Fifteen Volumes. With the Corrections ... - Page 132
by William Shakespeare - 1793
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The Works of William Shakespeare, Volume 6

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1811
...Crom. How does your grace i Wol. Why, well ; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now ; and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience. The king has cur'd me, I humbly thank his grace ; and from these shouldets,...
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The Works of William Shakespeare: In Nine Volumes, Volume 6

William Shakespeare, Samuel Johnson, George Steevens - Drama - 1811
...Crom. How does your grace ? Wol. Why, well ; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now ; and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience. The king has cur'd me, I humbly thank his grace ; and from these shoulders,...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: In Twenty-one Volumes, with the ..., Volume 15

William Shakespeare, Samuel Johnson, George Steevens - 1813
...CROMi. How does your grace ? WOL. Why, well ; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now ; and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience. The king has cur'd me, I humbly thank his grace; andfrom these shoulders,...
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The Bioscope, Or Dial of Life: Explained. To which is Added, a Translation ...

Granville Penn, Saint Paulinus (of Nola) - Christian life - 1814 - 309 pages
...become so blest as to be able truly to say, in the words given to the humbled Wolsey ; " I " know myself now; and I feel within me " a peace above all earthly dignities, a still " artd quiet conscience." 143. It is excellently observed by a great Christian moralist; that...
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The dramatic works of William Shakspeare. Whittingham's ed

William Shakespeare - 1814
...indeed. Crom. How does your grace ? Wol. Why, well; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now ; and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience. The king has cur'd me, I humbly thank his grace ; and from these shoulders,...
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An American Selection of Lessons in Reading and Speaking: Calculated to ...

Noah Webster - Readers - 1814 - 230 pages
...fallenMndeed. Crom- How does your grace ? WoL Why, well ; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now, and I. feel within me A peace, above all earthly dignities ; A still and quiet conscience. The king has cured me ; I humbly thank his grace ; and from these shoulders,...
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Lessons in Elocution, Or, A Selection of Pieces in Prose and Verse: For the ...

William Scott, John Walker, James Burgh - Elocution - 1814 - 407 pages
...Crom. How does -your grace ? WoL Why, well ; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. ' I know myself now, and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities— A still and quiet conscience. The king has curs'd me, I humbly thank his grace j and from these shoulders,...
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Elements of criticism [by H. Home].

Henry Home (lord Kames.) - 1817
...Cromwell. How does your grace ? Wolsey. Why, well: Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now, and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience. The king has cur'd me, I humbly thank his Grace; and from these shoulders,...
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Elements of Criticism

Lord Henry Home Kames - Criticism - 1819
...Cromwell. How does your Grace ? Wolsey. Why, well ; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now, and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities. A still and quiet conscience. The king has cur'd me, I humbly thank his Grace ; and from these shoulders,...
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Lessons in Elocution: Or, A Selection of Pieces, in Prose and Verse, for the ...

William Scott, John Walker, James Burgh - Elocution - 1820 - 407 pages
...Crom. How dues your grace'? Wol. Why, well j Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now, and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities — A still and quiet conscience. The king has curst me, 1 humbly thank his grace ; and from these shouldersThese...
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