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Books Books 81 - 90 of 186 on Why, well; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now; and I feel....  
" Why, well; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now; and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience. "
The Plays of William Shakspeare: In Fifteen Volumes. With the Corrections ... - Page 132
by William Shakespeare - 1793
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The Art of Elocution: From the Simple Articulation of the Elemental Sounds ...

George Vanderhoff - Elocution - 1846 - 383 pages
... How does your grace? Wol. Why, well ; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now ; and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience. Crom. I'm glad your grace has made that right use of it To endure more...
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Elements of Criticism: With Analyses, and Translation of Ancient and Foreign ...

Lord Henry Home Kames - Criticism - 1847 - 504 pages
...a principal Crimirell. How does your Grace 1 Never SO truly nappy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now, and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities, A (till and quiet conscience. The King has cur'd me, I humbly thank his Grace; and from these shoulders,...
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The claims of the gospel on the young

Joel Parker - 1847
...lips of one fallen from the heights of wealth and honour: " Never so truly happy I know myself now ; and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience." If, however, you continue to enjoy the most ample provision for your earthly...
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The Art of Elocution: Or, Logical and Musical Reading and Declamation. With ...

George Vandenhoff - Elocution - 1847 - 383 pages
... How does your grace ? Wol. Why, well; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now ; and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience. Crom. I'm glad your grace has made that right use of it Wol. I...
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North American first class reader: the sixth book of Tower's series for ...

David Bates Tower - 1853 - 426 pages
...indeed. Crom. How does your grace ? Wol. Why, well; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. 1 know myself now ; and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience. The king has cored me, I humbly thank his grace ; and from these shoulders,...
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An Inquiry Into the Philosophy and Religion of Shakspere

William John Birch - Religion in literature - 1848 - 547 pages
...Wolsey, declare to Cromwell that he was Well; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now, and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience. Could he know himself ? Was this a picture to show how easily a religious...
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Sharpe's London magazine, a journal of entertainment and instruction ...

Anna Maria Hall - 1848
...the emotion of respect and interest that swells our heart as we hear him say : " I know myself now; and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities, Л still and quiet conscience. * * I am able now, methlnks, (Out of a fortitude of soul I feel,) To...
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Parsing book: containing rules of syntax, and models for analyzing and ...

Allen Hayden Weld - 1848 - 111 pages
... How does your grace ? Wol. Why, well* Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. 1 know myself now ; and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities, 20 i Rule XXII ,Rem.2. A still and quiet conscience. The king has curM me, I humbly thank his grace...
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Poetry for schools

Frederick Charles Cook - 1849
...am fall'n indeed. Crom. How does your grace ? Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now ; and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience. The king has cured me. I humbly thank his grace, and from these shoulders...
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Exercises in Rhetorical Reading: With a Series of Introductory Lessons ...

Richard Green Parker - Elocution - 1849 - 432 pages
...Crom. How does your grace ? Wol. Why, well; 15 Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now, and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities ; A still and quiet conscience. The king has eased me. I humbly thank his grace : and, from these shoulders,...
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