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Books Books 71 - 80 of 173 on The objection arising from the impossibility of passing the first hour at Alexandria....  
" The objection arising from the impossibility of passing the first hour at Alexandria and the next at Rome supposes that, when the play opens, the spectator really imagines himself at Alexandria, and believes that his walk to the theatre has been a voyage... "
The Plays of William Shakspeare: In Fifteen Volumes. With the Corrections ... - Page 202
by William Shakespeare - 1793
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A New Variorum Edition of Shakespeare: The winter's tale. 1898

William Shakespeare - 1898
...Alexandria, and the next at Rome, supposes that when the play opens the spectator really imagines himself at Alexandria, and believes that his walk to the theatre...imagines this, may imagine more. He that can take the stage at one time for the palace of the Ptolemies, may take it in half an hour for the promontory of...
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Selections in English prose from Elizabeth to Victoria, 1580-1880

James Mercer Garnett - 1899
...the play opens, the spectator really imagines himself at Alexandria, and believes that his walk to me theatre has been a voyage to Egypt, and that he lives...imagines this may imagine more. He that can take the stage at one time for the palace of the Ptolemies, may take it in half an hour for the promontory of...
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Chamber's Cyclopædia of English Literature, Volume 2

Robert Chambers, David Patrick - Authors, English - 1902
...that when the play opens the spectator reall}' imagines himself at Alexandria, and believes that hi* n things whereof we llave no certain knowledge, we ought to regulate our assent and moderat CleopatR. Surely he that imagines this may imagine more. He that can take the stage at one time for...
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Eighteenth century essays on Shakespeare: ed. by D. Nichol Smith, M. A.

David Nichol Smith - 1903 - 358 pages
...Alexandria, and the next at Rome, supposes that when the play opens the spectator really imagines himself at Alexandria, and believes that his walk to the theatre...imagines this may imagine more. He that can take the stage at one time for the palace of the Ptolemies, may take it in half an hour for the promontory of...
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Eighteenth century essays on Shakespeare: ed. by D. Nichol Smith, M. A.

David Nichol Smith - 1903 - 358 pages
...Alexandria, and the next at Rome, supposes that when the play opens the spectator really imagines himself at Alexandria, and believes that his walk. to the...lives in the days of Antony and Cleopatra. Surely he L^ that imagines this may imagine more. He that can take the stage at one time for the palace of the...
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English Essays

Walter Cochrane Bronson - English essays - 1905 - 404 pages
...and the next at Rome, supposes that, when the play opens, the spectator really imagines himself 10 at Alexandria, and believes that his walk to the theatre...imagines this may imagine more. He that can take the stage at one time for the palace of the Ptolemies, may take it in half an hour for 15 the promontory...
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The British classical authors: with biographical notices. On the basis of a ...

Ludwig Herrig - English literature - 1906 - 752 pages
...when the play opens, the spectator really imagines himself at Alexandria, and believes that his us walk to the theatre has been a voyage to Egypt, and...imagines this may imagine more. He that can take the stage 120 at one time for the palace of the Ptolemies, may take it in half an hour for the promontory...
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Racine et Shakespeare

Stendhal - Romanticism - 1907 - 198 pages
...Alexandria, and the next at Rome, supposes that, when the play opens, the spectator really imagines himself at Alexandria, and believes that his walk to the theatre...that he lives in the days of Antony and Cleopatra. . . . Delusion, if delusion be admitted, haï no certain limitation ; if the spectator can be once...
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Racine Et Shakespeare

Stendhal - Romanticism - 1907 - 198 pages
...next at Rome, supposes that, when the play opens, the spectator really imagines himself at Alexandriu, and believes that his walk to the theatre has been...that he lives in the days of Antony and Cleopatra. . . . Delusion, if delusion be admitted, has no certain limitation ; if the spectator can be once persuaded...
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MRS. MONTAGU

R. HUCHON - 1907
...Cleopatra^ for instance, does the spectator really "imagine himself at Alexandria"? does he believe "that his walk to the theatre has been a voyage to Egypt"? If a London stage stands for Alexandria, why should it not stand for Rome also? "Delusion, if delusion...
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