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Books Books 41 - 50 of 187 on This shadowy desert, unfrequented woods, I better brook than flourishing peopled....  
" This shadowy desert, unfrequented woods, I better brook than flourishing peopled towns : Here can I sit alone, unseen of any, And to the nightingale's complaining notes Tune my distresses, and record my woes. "
Thrilling adventures of Daniel Ellis, the great Union guide of east ... - Page 3
by Daniel Ellis - 1867
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Laconics; or, The best words of the best authors [ed. by J. Timbs]. 1st Amer. ed

Laconics - 1829
...Grymesiane—1604. MCCVI1I. I better brook than flourishing peopled towns: There can I sit alone, unseen of any, And to the nightingale's complaining notes Tune my distresses, and record my woes. O thou that dost inhabit in my breast, Leave not the mansion so long tenantless; Lest, growing ruinous,...
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Laconics: Or, The Best Words of the Best Authors, Volume 2

John Timbs - Aphorisms and apothegms - 1829
...Grymeslone—1604,. MCCVIII. I better brook than flourishing peopled towns: There can I sit alone, unseen of any, And to the nightingale's complaining notes Tune my distresses, and record my woes. O thou that dost inhabit in my breast, Leave not the mansion so long tenantless; Lest, growing ruinous,...
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A Descriptive Account of the Second Royal Gala Festival at Stratford-upon ...

1830 - 87 pages
...unfrequented woods, "I better brook, than flourishing peopled towns; "Here I can sit alone, unseen of any, " And to the nightingale's complaining notes, " Tune my distresses and record my woes." Yes, Gentlemen, he preferred solitude and heavenly contemplation on " the willow'd banks" of his own...
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Herodotus, tr. by W. Beloe

Herodotus - 1830
...desert, unfrequented woods, I better brook than florishing peopled towns. Here 1 can sit alone, unseen of any. And to the nightingale's complaining notes Tune my distresses, and record my woes. — 2'. > by various presents on both sides. His fame had so increased, that he was celebrated through...
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Selections from the choric poetry of the Greek deramatic writers

English poetry - 1832 - 246 pages
...Nightly to thee her sad song mourneth well." Comus, 234. And Shakspeare : " Here I can sit alone, unseen of any, And to the Nightingale's complaining notes, Tune my distresses, and record my woes." Two Gent. of Perona, Act V. Sc. 4. But see Coleridge's Poem on the Nightingale : " Most musical, most melancholy...
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The plays and poems of Shakspeare [according to the text of E. Malone] with ...

William Shakespeare - 1832
...desert, unfrequented woods, I better brook than florishing peopled towns : Here can I sit alone, unseen of any, And, to the nightingale's complaining notes, Tune my distresses, and record 1 my woes. O thou that dost inhabit in my breast, Leave not the mansion so long tenantless ; Lest,...
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Works of Lord Byron: With His Letters and Journals, and His Life, Volume 16

George Gordon Byron Baron Byron, Thomas Moore - Literary Criticism - 1833
...desert, unfrequented woods, I better brook than flourishing peopled towns : There can I sit alone, unseen of any, And to the nightingale's complaining notes Tune my distresses, and record my woes." — SHAKSPEARE.] (3) [MS. — " Call'd social, where all vice and hatred are."] How lonely every freeborn...
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The Works of Lord Byron: With His Letters and Journals,

George Gordon Byron Baron Byron, Thomas Moore, John Wright - 1833
...desert, unfrequented woods, I better brook than flourishing peopled towns : There can I sit alone, unseen of any, And to the nightingale's complaining notes Tune my distresses, and record my woes." — SUAKSPEARE.] (3) [MS. — " Call'd social, where all vice and hatred are. "] XXVII. How lonely...
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The plays and poems of William Shakespeare: accurately printed from the text ...

William Shakespeare - 1833 - 1064 pages
...desert, unfrequented wood*, 1 better brook than flourishing peopled towns t Here can I sit alone, unseen inclin'd. , Mai. With this, there grows, In my most ill-coinpos'd affection, such A stanchle ') 0 thou that dost inhabit in my breast, Lea^e not the mansion so long tenantless; Lest, growing ruinous,...
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