Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books 11 - 20 of 27 on The vis inertiae is a passive Principle by which Bodies persist in their Motion or....  
" The vis inertiae is a passive Principle by which Bodies persist in their Motion or Rest, receive Motion in proportion to the Force impressing it, and resist as much as they are resisted. By this Principle alone there never could have been any Motion in... "
Opticks:: Or, A Treatise of the Reflections, Refractions, Inflections and ... - Page 367
by Sir Isaac Newton - 1730 - 382 pages
Full view - About this book

Problems of life and mind

George Henry Lewes - 1875
...motion in proportion to the force impressing it, and resist as much as they are resisted," he adds, " by this principle alone there never could have been any motion in the * MONBODDO, Ancient Metaphysics, II. 336. VOL. II. 12 world." Surely if every particle had its own...
Full view - About this book

The Newtonian Revolution

I. Bernard Cohen - Science - 1983 - 404 pages
...Rest, receive Motion in proportion to the Force impressing it, and resist as much as they are resisted. By this Principle alone there never could have been any Motion in the World' (Newton, 1952, p. 397). The scholar cannot help but be interested in the fact that Newton still continued...
Limited preview - About this book

The Greek Mode of Thought in Western Philosophy

Alexander Sissel Kohanski - Philosophy - 1984 - 340 pages
...passive principle by which bodies . . . receive motion in proportion to the force impressing it. ... By this principle alone there never could have been any motion in the world. It seems to me farther, that these particles [of matter] have not only a vis inertiae, accompanied...
Limited preview - About this book

Historical and Philosophical Perspectives of Science

Roger H. Stuewer - History - 1989 - 384 pages
...faithful to it; see Opticks (Dover edition), page 397: "The Vis inertiae is a passive Principle. ... By this Principle alone there never could have been...any Motion in the World. Some other Principle was necessary for putting Bodies into Motion . . ."; ibid., page 401: "It seems to me farther, that these...
Limited preview - About this book

The Scientific Background to Modern Philosophy: Selected Readings

Michael R. Matthews - Philosophy - 1989 - 162 pages
...Rest, receive Motion in proportion to the Force impressing it, and resist as much as they are resisted. By this Principle alone there never could have been...any Motion in the World. Some other Principle was necessary for putting Bodies into Motion; and now they are in Motion, some other Principle is necessary...
Limited preview - About this book

North America, Volume 1, Part 1

Bruce G. Trigger, Wilcomb E. Washburn - Eskimos - 1996 - 1072 pages
...go its own? The Vis inertiae is a passive Principle by which Bodies persist in their Motion or Rest By this Principle alone there never could have been any Motion in the World.178 Once more, we see Newton reject the world of Descartes: The passivity of mechanicism would...
Limited preview - About this book

The Cambridge History of Seventeenth-century Philosophy, Volume 1

Daniel Garber, Michael Ayers - Philosophy - 2003 - 1616 pages
...Rest, receive Motion in proportion to the Force impressing it, and resist as much as they are resisted. By this Principle alone there never could have been any Motion in the World.' Newton goes on to surmise that God in the Beginning form'd Matter in solid, massy, hard, impenetrable,...
Limited preview - About this book

The Cambridge Companion to Galileo

Peter Machamer - Philosophy - 1998 - 462 pages
...Rest, receive Motion in proportion to the Force impressing it, and resist as much as they are resisted. By this principle alone there never could have been any Motion in the World.13 Although it explains why bodies persist in their motions, the vis inertiae is nothing like...
Limited preview - About this book

The Philosophy of Physics

Roberto Torretti - Philosophy - 1999 - 512 pages
...Rest, receive Motion in proportion to the Force impressing it, and resist as much as they are resisted. By this Principle alone there never could have been...any Motion in the World. Some other Principle was necessary for putting Bodies into Motion. (Newton, Opticks, p. 397) Indeed, only by regarding impressed...
Limited preview - About this book

Correspondence

Gottfried Wilhelm Freiherr von Leibniz, Samuel Clarke, Roger Ariew - Philosophy - 2000 - 110 pages
...rest, receive motion in proportion to the force impressing it, and resist as much as they are resisted. By this principle alone there never could have been...any motion in the world. Some other principle was necessary for putting bodies into motion; and now that they are in motion, some other principle is...
Limited preview - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF