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Books Books 61 - 70 of 174 on And husband nature's riches from expense ; They are the lords and owners of their....  
" And husband nature's riches from expense ; They are the lords and owners of their faces, Others but stewards of their excellence. The summer's flower is to the summer sweet, Though to itself it only live and die, But if that flower with base infection... "
Archiv für das Studium der neueren Sprachen und Literaturen - Page 215
1903
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Lux E Tenebris: Or, The Testimony of Consciousness. A Theoretic Essay

Giles - Consciousness - 1874 - 361 pages
...live and die ; But if that flower with base infection meet, The basest weed out-braves his dignity : For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds, Lilies that fester, smell fax worse than weeds." § XXXVI. But the mind is not a mere mirror, presenting only reflections of...
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Proverbial folk-lore

Alan Benjamin Cheales - 1875
...prickles. Comiptio optimi pestima. This may be paraphrased The finest silks are soonest stained. The sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds ; Lilies, that fester, smell far worse than weeds. — Shakespeare. When a good man errs, he errs with a vengeance. Better be a fool than a knave....
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SONGS OF THREE CENTURIES

JOHN GREENLEAF WHITTIER - 1876
...live and die; But if that flower with base infection meet, The basest weed outbraves his dignity : For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds ; Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds. ALAS, 'tistrue, I havegone hereand there, And made myself a motley to the view, Gored mine own...
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Chaucer to Burns

Rossiter Johnson - English poetry - 1876
...live and die ; But it that flower with base infection meet, The basest weed out-braves his dignity : ure fade l weeds. XCV. How sweet and lovely dost thou make the shame, Which, like a canker in the fragrant rose,...
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A Dictionary of Poetical Illustrations: Specially Selected with View to the ...

Robert Aitkin Bertram - English language - 1877 - 748 pages
...live and die ; But if that flower with base infection meet. The basest weed outbraves its dignity ; For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds ; Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds. Shaktspcari. 5io. COUNTRY LIFE. NONE can describe the sweets of country life, But tbose blest...
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The plant-lore & garden-craft of Shakespeare

Henry Nicholson Ellacombe - 1878
...action-taking knave. King Lear, act ii, sc. 2. (17) Macbeth. Thou Lily-livered boy. Macbcth, act v, sc. 2. (18) For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds— Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds. (19) Nor did I wonder at the Lilies white, Nor praise the deep vermilion of the Rose. Sonnet...
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The Poems

William Shakespeare, Alexander Dyce - 1878 - 288 pages
...live and die ; But if that flower with base infection meet, The basest weed out-braves his dignity : For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds ; Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds. xcv. How sweet and lovely dost thou make the shame Which, like a canker in the fragrant rose,...
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"Airy Fairy Lilian."

Duchess - 1879 - 363 pages
...that is also distinctly audible, carries her down instantly to the dining-room. 20 CHAPTER XXII. " For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds ; lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds. **••*•• This thought is as a death." — SHAKSPEARB. THE next day is dark and lowering,...
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archiv

ludwig herrig - 1879
...But if that flower with base infection meet, (XCIX, 11. 12) The basest weed outbraves bis dignity ; For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds: Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds. LXIX. (Die Beurtheiler) To thy fair flower add the rank of weeds; But why thy odour matcheth...
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'Airy fairy Lilian', by the author of 'Phyllis'.

Margaret Wolfe Hungerford - 1879
...word that is also distinctly audible, carries her down instantly to the dining-room. CHAPTER XXII. For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds ; Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds. This thought is as a death. — SHAKESPEARE. next day is dark and lowering, to Lilian's great...
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