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Books Books 81 - 90 of 175 on And husband nature's riches from expense ; They are the lords and owners of their....  
" And husband nature's riches from expense ; They are the lords and owners of their faces, Others but stewards of their excellence. The summer's flower is to the summer sweet, Though to itself it only live and die, But if that flower with base infection... "
Archiv für das Studium der neueren Sprachen und Literaturen - Page 215
1903
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Mr. William Shakespeare's comedies, histories, tragedies and poems ..., Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1883
...live and die, But if that flower with base infection meet, The basest weed outbraves his dignity : For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds ; Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds. XCIT i* Lilies that fester, etc. A paradoxical notion prernleut la S 's time. It ii not true....
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Texas School Journal, Volume 20

Schools - 1902
...statement: for example, "Music that gentlier on the spirit lies, Than tir'd eyelids upon tir'd eyes." or ''For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds : Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds." (b) A metaphor — in which the resemblance of two things is indicated by applying the name...
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A Dictionary of Quotations from English and American Poets

Anna Lydia Ward - American poetry - 1883 - 761 pages
...live and die ; But if that flower with base infection meet, The basest weed outbraves his dignity : For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds ; Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds. 1793 Shaks. : Sonnet xciv. When lovely woman stoops to folly, And finds too late that men betray,...
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Mr. William Shakespeare's Comedies, Histories, Tragedies, and Poems, Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1883
...live and die, But if that flower with base infection meet, The basest weed outbraves his dignity : For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds ; Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds. XPIT '* Lilies that ffster, etc. A paradoxical notion prevalent in S 'a time. It u How sweet...
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Aunt Hepsy's foundling

Bertha Jane Laffan - 1884
...tender, pitiful Christ, and is in truth but a hateful wresting of the highest good to the lowest ends ; * For sweetest things, turn sourest by their deeds ; Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds." Jeva, full of quick remembrance of Mr. Grimshaw's sympathetic words only a day or two ago,...
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Shakespeare's Works, Volume 20

William Shakespeare - 1884
...only live and die, But if that flower with base infection meet, The basest weed outbraves his dignity: For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds; Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds. XCV. How sweet and lovely dost thou make the shame Which, like a canker in the fragrant rose,...
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Truths illustrated by great authors [ed. by W. White].

Truths - History - 1885
...live and die ; But if that flower with base Infection meet, The basest weed outbraves his dignity ; For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds ; Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds. Coeruption. — Shakespeare. IF that the Heavens do not their visible spirits Send quickly down...
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'Airy Fairy Lilian'

Duchess - History - 1886 - 423 pages
...word that is also distinctly audible, carries her down instantly to the dining-room. CHAPTER XXII. For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds ; Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds. This thought is as a death. — SHAKESPEARE. THE next day is dark and lowering, to Lilian's...
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Complete Sonnets

William Shakespeare - Poetry - 1991 - 74 pages
...only live and die; But if that flower with base infection meet, The basest weed outbraves his dignity: For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds: Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds. xcv How sweet and lovely dost thou make the shame. Which, like a canker in the fragrant rose,...
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Shakespeare on Love: Quotations from the Plays & Poems

William Shakespeare - Poetry - 1991 - 96 pages
...stands off as gross As black and white, my eye will scarcely see it. The Life of Henry the Fifth (2.2) Sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds; Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds. Sonnets (94) My blood is mingled with the crime of lust; For if we two be one, and thou play...
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