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" His mind and hand went together ; and what he thought, he uttered with that easiness, that we have scarce received from him a blot in his papers. "
The Plays and Poems of William Shakspeare - Page 662
by William Shakespeare, James Boswell, Alexander Pope, Samuel Johnson, Edward Capell, George Steevens, Richard Farmer, Nicholas Rowe - 1821
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The Pursuit of Knowledge Under Difficulties: Illustrated by Anecdotes ...

George Lillie Craik - Self-culture - 1834
...author, say, " Who, as he was a happy imitator of nature, was a most gentle expresser of it. II is mind and hand went together ; and what he thought, he uttered with that easiness, that we have scarce received from him a blot in his papers." It is a common, but a very ill-founded...
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The Dramatic Works and Poems of William Shakespeare, Volume 1

William Shakespeare, Samuel Weller Singer, Charles Symmons - 1836
...numbers, as he conceived thfi : Who, as he was a happie imitator of Nature, was a most gentle expresscr rn only gather his works, and give them you, to prnise him. It is yours that reade him. And there we hope,...
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The complete works of William Shakspeare, with notes by the most emiinent ...

William Shakespeare - 1838
...numbers, as he conceived them : Who, as he was a happie imitator of Nature, was a most gentle cxpresser and ho[>e of action ; but we <lo learn By those that know the \ery nerves of stat easincsse, that wee have scarse received from him a blot in his papers. But it is nut our province,...
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The Quarterly Review, Volume 131

William Gifford, Sir John Taylor Coleridge, John Gibson Lockhart, Whitwell Elwin, William Macpherson, William Smith, John Murray, Rowland Edmund Prothero, George Walter Prothero - 1871
...numbers, f as he conceived them : who, as ho was a happy imitator of nature, was a most gentle cxpresser of it. His mind and hand went together; and what he thought ho uttered with that easiness, that we have scarce received from him a blot in his papers.' { Now these...
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The Foreign monthly review and continental literary journal

Language Arts & Disciplines - 1839
...over-scrupulous. In the Player's Preface to the first folio edition, occurs this noteworthy passage : " His mind and hand went together ; and what he thought...scarse received from him a blot in his papers." But return we to Dr. Ulrici. The next part of his work is devoted to criticisms on the separate plays of...
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Southern Literary Messenger, Volume 9

Religion - 1843
...rest, absolule in iheir numbers, as he conceived the : Who, as he was a happie imitator of Mature, was a most gentle expresser of it. His mind and hand...blot in his papers. But it is not our province, who only gather his works, and give them you, to praise him. It is yours that rende him. And there we hope,...
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The Southern literary messenger

1843 - 780 pages
...numbers, as he conceived the : Who, as he was a bappie imitator of Nature, was a most gentle expnsser of it. His mind and hand went together: and what he thought, he uttered with that casinesse, that wee have sŤarse received from him a blot in his papers. But it is not our province,...
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Bibliotheca Sacra and Theological Review, Volume 13

Theology - 1856
...author, applies to the early English writers generally : " As he was a happy imitator of nature, so he was a most gentle expresser of it. His mind and hand...together ; and what he thought, he uttered with that easiness, that we have scarce received from him a blot in his papers." These characteristics in the...
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The Gentleman's Magazine

Early English newspapers - 1844
...Heminge and Condell, the editors of the first folio ? They say of him that, " what he thought he vttered with that easinesse that wee have scarse received from him a blot in his papers. But it is not our prouince, who onely gather his works and give them to you, to praise him." a. lady who was almost one...
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The Works of William Shakespeare: The Text Formed from an Entirely ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1844
...rest, absolute in their numbers, as he concciued the : Who, as he was a happie imitator of Nature, was a most gentle expresser of it. His mind and hand went together : And what he thought, he vttered with that easinesse, that wee haue scarse receiued from him a blot in his papers. But it is...
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