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Books Books 11 - 20 of 90 on People seek for what they call wit, on all subjects, and in all places ; not considering....  
" People seek for what they call wit, on all subjects, and in all places ; not considering that nature loves truth so well, that it hardly ever admit; of flourishing : Conceit is to nature what paint is to beauty ; it is not only needless, but impairs what... "
The works of Alexander Pope. With a selection of explanatory notes, and the ... - Page 55
by Alexander Pope - 1812
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Elegant Epistles: Or, A Copious Collection of Familiar and Amusing Letters,

Vicesimus Knox, Marcus Tullius Cicero, Pliny (the Younger.), William Melmoth - English letters - 1790 - 798 pages
...places; not confidering that nature loves truth fo well, that it hardly ever admits of flouriihing : conceit is to nature, what paint is to beauty ; it is not only needlcfs, but impairs what it would improve. There is a certain majefty in fimplicity, which is far...
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Elegant Extracts: Or, Useful and Entertaining Passages in Prose ..., Volume 2

1797 - 1120 pages
...all places; notconfidering that nature loves truth fo well, that it hardly ever admits of flouriming. Conceit is to nature what paint is to beauty: it is not only needlefs, but impairs what it would improve. There is a certain majefty in /implicit)', which is far...
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The Works of Alexander Pope, Esq. In Verse and Prose: Containing ..., Volume 7

Alexander Pope - Literary Criticism - 1806
...places ; not confidering that nature loves truth fo well, that it hardly ever admits of flourifhing : Conceit is to nature what paint is to beauty ; it is not only needlefs, but impairs what it would improve. There is a certain majefty in fimplicity, which is far...
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The works of Alexander Pope. Containing the principal notes of drs ...

Alexander Pope - 1806
...places ; not confidering that nature loves truth fo well, that it hardly ever admits of flourifhing : Conceit is to nature what paint is to beauty ; it is not only needlefs, but impairs what it would improve. There is a certain majefty in fimplicity, which is far...
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The Works of Alexander Pope, Esq: In Verse and Prose, Volume 7

Alexander Pope, William Lisle Bowles, William Warburton, Joseph Warton - Literary Criticism - 1806
...places; not confidering that nature loves truth fo well, that it hardly ever admits of flourifhing : Conceit is to nature what paint is to beauty ; it is not only needlefs, but impairs what it would improve. There is a certain majefty in fimplicity, which is far...
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The Works of Alexander Popekesq., with Notes and Illustrations by ..., Volume 1

Alexander Pope - 1824
...subjects and in all places, not considering that nature loves truth so well, that it hardly ever admits of flourishing. Conceit is to nature what paint is...majesty in simplicity, which is far above all the quaintiiess of wit ; insomuch that the critics have excluded wit from the loftiest poetry, as well...
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The works of Alexander Pope: esq. with notes and illustrations by ..., Volume 1

Alexander Pope, William Roscoe - English literature - 1824
...subjects and in all places, not considering that nature loves truth so well, that it hardly ever admits of flourishing. Conceit is to nature what paint is to beauty ; it is not only needless, but impairs whavt it would improve. There is a certain majesty in simplicity, which is far above all the quaintness...
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Elegant Extracts: Or Useful and Entertaining Passages in Prose

Vicesimus Knox - English prose literature - 1824 - 772 pages
...what it would improve. There и a certain majesty in simplicity, which il iar above all the qiiamtness of wit : insomuch, that the critics have excluded wit from the loftiest poetry, as well a the lowest, and forbid it to the epic w less than the pastoral. I should certainly displease all...
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Prose

James Gates Percival - Literature - 1826
...not confidering that nature loves truth fo well, that it hardly ever admits of flouriihing. Confoit is to nature what paint is to beauty ; it is not only needlefs, but impairs what it would improve. There is a certain majefty in fimplicity, which is far...
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The London Encyclopaedia: Or, Universal Dictionary of Science, Art ..., Volume 9

Thomas Curtis - Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1829
...subjects, and in all places ; not considering that nature loves truth so well, that it hardly ever admiU equired to be borne. It is excellent for liquor casks...to shrink, nor to change the color of the liquor Id. Impetuous sprean The stream and smoaking, flourished o'er his head. Id. They dilate sometimes,...
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