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Books Books 21 - 30 of 91 on People seek for what they call wit, on all subjects, and in all places ; not considering....  
" People seek for what they call wit, on all subjects, and in all places ; not considering that nature loves truth so well, that it hardly ever admit; of flourishing : Conceit is to nature what paint is to beauty ; it is not only needless, but impairs what... "
The works of Alexander Pope. With a selection of explanatory notes, and the ... - Page 55
by Alexander Pope - 1812
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Laconics: Or, The Best Words of the Best Authors, Volume 1

John Timbs - Aphorisms and apothegms - 1829
...subjects, and in all places; not considering that nature 'loves truth so well, that it hardly ever admits of flourishing. Conceit is to nature what paint is...only needless, but impairs what it would improve.^ Pope. cxxxrv. A man who has been brought up amongbooks, and is able to talk of nothing else, is a very...
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Laconics; or, The best words of the best authors [ed. by J. Timbs]. 1st Amer. ed

Laconics - History - 1829
...subjects, and in all places; not considering that nature loves truth so well, that it hardly ever admits of flourishing. Conceit is to nature what paint is...only needless, but impairs what it would improve. — Pope. CXXXIV. A man who has been brought up among books, and is able to talk of nothing else, is...
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The London encyclopaedia: or, Universal dictionary of science ..., Volume 18

Thomas Curtis - Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1829
...Stillingßeel. As my Buxoma With gentle finger, streaked her milky care, I quaintly stole a kiss. Gay. There is a certain majesty in simplicity, which is far above all the quaintness of wit. Pope. To this we owe those monstrous productions, which under the name of trips, spies, amusements,...
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The London encyclopaedia, or, Universal dictionary of science, art ...

Thomas Curtis (of Grove house sch, Islington)
...nature loves truth so well, that it hardly ever admiu of flourishing. Conceit i* to nature what paint i* to beauty ; it is not only needless, but impairs what it would improve. Id. Impetuous sprcaa The stream and smo*bing, flourished o'er his head. They dilate sometimes, and...
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The London encyclopaedia, or, Universal dictionary of science, art ...

Thomas Curtis (of Grove house sch, Islington) - 1839
...; not considering that nature love» truth no well, that it hardly ever admits of /'.<•-(risking. Conceit is to nature what paint is to beauty ; it is not only needles«, bat impairs what it would improve. Id. Impetuous »préau The stream and smoaking, flourished...
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The works of Alexander Pope, with notes and illustrations, by himself and ...

Alexander Pope - 1847
...subjects and in all places, not considering that nature loves truth so well, that it hardly ever admits of flourishing. Conceit is to nature what paint is...excluded wit from the loftiest poetry, as well as from the lowest ; and forbid it to the epic no less than to the pastoral." A still more decisive instance...
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The World's Laconics: Or, The Best Thoughts of the Best Authors

Tryon Edwards - Quotations, English - 1853 - 432 pages
...can hide his griefs. — Lavater. CONCEIT. — Nature loves truth so well, that it hardly ever admits of flourishing. Conceit is to nature what paint is...only needless, but impairs what it would improve. — Pope. CONCEIT AND CONFIDENCE. — Conceit and confidence are both of them. cheats ; the first always...
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Laconics, or The best words of the best authors

Reference - 1856
...subjects, and in all places ; not considering that nature loves truth so well, that it hardly ever admits of flourishing. Conceit is to nature what paint is...only needless, but impairs what it would improve. — Pope. CXXXIV. A man who has been brought up among books, and is able to talk of nothing else, is...
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Great Truths by great Authors

1856
...of their own company, as those Coxcombs who are on the best terms with themselves. ©OltWt — Pope. CONCEIT is to nature what paint is to beauty ; it...only needless, but impairs what it would improve. . __ Shakspeare. CONCEIT in weakest bodies strongest works. — Cicero. TT is the part of a prudent...
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Many thoughts of many minds. Compiled by H. Southgate

Henry Southgate - 1862
...speaks of himself the less he likes to hear another talked of. Lamter. CONCEIT— a Self- Imposition. People seek for what they call wit, on all subjects...only needless, but impairs what it would improve. Pepe. CONCEIT— Workings o£ Conceit in weakest bodies strongest works. CONCILIATION-Immediate. Agree...
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