Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books 41 - 50 of 89 on People seek for what they call wit, on all subjects, and in all places ; not considering....
" People seek for what they call wit, on all subjects, and in all places ; not considering that nature loves truth so well, that it hardly ever admit; of flourishing : Conceit is to nature what paint is to beauty ; it is not only needless, but impairs what... "
The works of Alexander Pope. With a selection of explanatory notes, and the ... - Page 55
by Alexander Pope - 1812
Full view - About this book

The voice of wisdom, a treasury of moral truths from the best authors ...

Voice - 1883 - 167 pages
...some good, the Latter following the former as surely as day follows night. — iR. Ellis. Conceit. Conceit is to nature what paint is to beauty ; it...only needless, but impairs what it would improve. — Pope. Conceit, as viewed by God. Nothing in men is more odious and offensive to God than a proud...
Full view - About this book

The golden gems of life: or, Gathered jewels for the home circle

Smith C. Ferguson, Emory Adams Allen - Philosophy - 1884 - 608 pages
...world. It is vanity drawn from all other shifts, and forced to appeal to itself for admiration. It is to nature what paint is to beauty ; it is not only needless, but it impairs what it would improve. He who gives himself airs of importance exhibits the credentials...
Full view - About this book

English letters and letterwriters of the eighteenth century: With ...

Jonathan Swift, Alexander Pope - Authors, English - 1886 - 552 pages
...subjects and in all places ; not considering that Nature loves truth so well that it hardly ever admits of flourishing. Conceit is to Nature what paint is...improve. There is a certain majesty in simplicity, which 1 Pope refers to his first published verses — tho Pastorals, a copy of which he had • eni to Walsh....
Full view - About this book

The works of ...

A. Pope - 1889
...subjects, and in all places ; not considering that Nature loves truth so well that it hardly ever admits of flourishing. Conceit is to nature what paint is...only needless but impairs what it would improve." * Hence the various maxims in the Essay directed against the different forms of false wit; eg, the...
Full view - About this book

Treasury of Wisdom, Wit and Humor, Odd Comparisons and Proverbs: Authors ...

Quotations, English - 1891 - 527 pages
...who gives himself airs of Importance exhibits the credentials of impotence. Lavater. INFLUENCE OP. Conceit is to nature what paint is to beauty ; it...only needless, but impairs what it would improve. Pope. NATURAL то HUMANITY. I say that conceit is just as natural a thing to human minds as a centre...
Full view - About this book

Six Centuries of English Poetry: Tennyson to Chaucer : Typical Selections ...

James Baldwin - English poetry - 1892 - 308 pages
...no man so often as by Pope, and by Pope nowhere so often as in this poem." 1. Conceit. Affected wit. "Conceit is to nature what paint is to beauty; it...only needless but impairs what it would improve." — Pope. 2. fit. Proper. " Fit audience find, though few " (Milton, " Paradise Lost," V, 7). 3. wit....
Full view - About this book

Treasury of Thought: Forming an Encyclopædia of Quotations from Ancient and ...

Quotations, English - 1894 - 579 pages
...is vanity driven from all other shifts, and forced to appeal to itself for admiration. — Hazlitl. Conceit is to nature what paint is to beauty ; it...only needless, but impairs what it would improve. — Pope. I will not be as those who spend the day in No wonder we are all more or less pleased complaining...
Full view - About this book

Many Thoughts of Many Minds: A Treasury of Quotations from the Literature of ...

Louis Klopsch - Quotations, English - 1896 - 304 pages
...HAZLITT. The certain way to be cheated is to fancy one's self more cunning than others. — CHARRON. Conceit is to nature what paint is to beauty ; it...only needless, but impairs what it would improve. — POPE. Be very slow to believe that you are wiser than all others ; it is a fatal but common error....
Full view - About this book

Proverbial Wisdom: Comprising a Collection of Proverbs, Maxims and Ethical ...

Maxims - 1897 - 162 pages
...evil eyes that it cannot delight in the sun. [4. Nature loves truth so well that it hardly ever admits of flourishing. Conceit is to nature what paint is...only needless, but impairs what it would improve. 15. Nothing is more noble, nothing more venerable, than truth. Faithfulness and truth are the most...
Full view - About this book

A History of English Critical Terms

Jeremiah Wesley Bray - Criticism - 1898 - 345 pages
...necessity lead us to the grossest absurdities, and stillest pedantry and conceit. SHAFTESBURY, I., p. 202. Conceit is to nature what paint is to beauty ; it...only needless, but impairs what it would improve. 1706. POPE, VI., p. 51. Some to conceit alone their taste confme, And glittering thoughts strike out...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF