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" Never literary attempt was more unfortunate than my Treatise of Human Nature. It fell dead-born from the press, without reaching such distinction, as even to excite a murmur among the zealots. "
Essays: Moral, Political, and Literary - Page 2
by David Hume - 1889
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Hume

William Angus Knight - 1886 - 239 pages
...Own Life ' he says : " Xever literary attempt was more unfortunate. It fell dead-born from the press, without reaching such- distinction as even to excite a murmur among the zealots." In- point of fact it had been reviewed with a mixture of severity and appreciation, though without...
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The Popular Science Monthly, Volume 34

Technology - 1889
...publication, in England, was, to use the author's own language, that "it fell dead-born from the press, without reaching such distinction as even to excite a murmur among the zealots." It was not till his "Essays, Moral and Political," were published (1741-1748), and achieved notable...
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The Philosophy of Hume: As Contained in Extracts from the First Book and the ...

David Hume - Knowledge, Theory of - 1893 - 176 pages
...13 attempt was more unfortunate than my Treatise of Human Nature. It fell dead-born from the press, without reaching such distinction as even to excite...soon recovered the blow, and prosecuted with great ardor my studies in the country. In 1742 I printed at Edinburgh the first part of my Essays ; the work...
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The History of Civilisation in Scotland, Volume 4

John Mackintosh - Scotland - 1896
...literary attempt was more unfortunate than my Treatise of Human Nature. It fell dead-born from the press without reaching such distinction, as even to excite a murmur among the Zealots." This caused him to recast portions of it in a more popular lorm, under the titles of " Essays : Moral...
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The Outlines of Literature, English and American: Based Upon Shaw's Manual ...

Truman Jay Backus, Thomas Budd Shaw - American literature - 1897 - 481 pages
...Treatise on Human Nature. " Never," says Hume's autobiography, " was literary attempt more unfortunate. But being naturally of a cheerful and sanguine temper, I very soon recovered the blow." The first volume of Moral and Philosophical Essays, published in 1741, met with a more favorable reception....
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University Addresses: Being Addresses on Subjects of Academic Study ...

John Caird, Edward Caird - Professional education - 1898 - 383 pages
...little exaggeration due to modified ambition, " was more unfortunate. It fell dead-born from the press, without reaching such distinction as even to excite a murmur among the zealots." The true cause of the failure, in so far as lack of immediate success is equivalent to failure, is...
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A History of Modern Philosophy: A Sketch of the History of ..., Volume 1

Harald Hffding - Philosophy - 1900
...At first, however, it was destined to have no result " It fell," he says, " dead-born from the press without reaching such distinction as even to excite a murmur among the zealots." Hume's literary ambition, which led him to pronounce this brilliant testimony to his mental abilities...
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Universal Pronouncing Dictionary of Biography and Mythology: Her to Z

Joseph Thomas - Biography - 1901
...London in 1738, but was treated with discouraging neglect He says himself, "It fell from the press without reaching such distinction as even to excite a murmur among the zealots." Mackintosh calls this work " the first systematic attack on all the principles of knowledge and belief,...
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David Hume and His Influence on Philosophy and Theology

James Orr - 1903 - 246 pages
...literary attempt was more unfortunate than my Treatise of Human Nature. It fell dead-born from the press; without reaching such distinction as even to excite a murmur among the zealots." 2 The book was published anonymously; a circumstance which may have helped to doom it to obscurity....
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Introduction to the History of Modern Philosophy

Arthur Stone Dewing - Philosophy, Modern - 1903 - 346 pages
...development of human speculation, Hume peevishly writes that his first work " fell dead-born from the press without reaching such distinction as even to excite a murmur among the zealots." 10 Thoroughly dissatisfied with the reception of the " Treatise," Hume sought to gain recognition by...
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