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" What may this mean, That thou, dead corse, again in complete steel, Revisit'st thus the glimpses of the moon, Making night hideous, and we fools of nature So horridly to shake our disposition With thoughts beyond the reaches of our souls? "
The Plays of William Shakespeare: With Notes of Various Commentators - Page 34
by William Shakespeare, Manley Wood - 1806
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Ulysses Annotated: Notes for James Joyce's Ulysses

Don Gifford, Robert J. Seidman - Literary Criticism - 1989 - 645 pages
"Teaches more than how to read a particular novel; it teaches us more profoundly how to read anything. This, I think, is the book's main virtue. It teaches us readers to ...
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Meaning and Being in Myth

Norman Austin - Social Science - 2010
...the ghost, is awestruck: What may this mean That thou, dead corse, again in complete steel Revisits thus the glimpses of the moon, Making night hideous,...disposition With thoughts beyond the reaches of our souls? (I.iv.51-56) This ghost, breathing war, is the very form of anger, and the love he demands from his...
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Hamlet

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1992 - 138 pages
...To cast thee up again. What may this mean That thou, dead corse, again in complete steel, Revisits thus the glimpses of the moon, Making night hideous,...souls? Say, why is this? Wherefore? What should we do? [Ghost beckons Hamlet. HORATIO It beckons you to go away with it, As if it some impartment did desire...
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The Psychotic: Aspects of the Personality

David Rosenfeld - Psychology - 1992 - 318 pages
...death, have burst their cerements; why the sepulchre, wherein we saw thee quietly inurned, hath op'd his ponderous and marble jaws, to cast thee up again....mean, that thou, dead cor'se, again in complete steel revisits thus the glimpses of the moon, making night hideous, and we fools of nature so horridly to...
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Shakespeare as Prompter: The Amending Imagination and the Therapeutic Process

Murray Cox, Alice Theilgaard - Literary Criticism - 1994 - 454 pages
...tongue.' (Hamlet I.2.250) 'What may this mean, That thou, dead corse, again in complete steel Revisits thus the glimpses of the moon, Making night hideous...disposition With thoughts beyond the reaches of our souls?' (Hamlet I.4.5 1) Shakespeare prompts the work of the therapist by enlarging his range of affective...
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Gothick Origins and Innovations

Allan Lloyd Smith, Victor Sage - American fiction - 1994 - 234 pages
...death, Have burst their cerements, why the sepulchre Wherein we saw thee quietly inurn'd Hath op'd his ponderous and marble jaws To cast thee up again....mean. That thou, dead corse, again in complete steel Revisits thus the glimpses of the moon. Making night hideous and we fools of nature So horridly to...
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Big-time Shakespeare

Michael D. Bristol - Drama - 1996 - 256 pages
...mean, That thou, dead corse, again in complete steel Revisits thus the glimpses of the moon, Making the night hideous, and we fools of nature So horridly...souls? Say why is this? wherefore? what should we do? (1.4.51-56) The ghost at Elsinore does answer to Hamlet's demand, though without any guarantee of certainty....
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The Fiery Cross: The Ku Klux Klan in America

Wyn Craig Wade - History - 1998 - 526 pages
...not been corrected. APPENDIX A The Original Ku-K/ux Prescript of Reconstruction * PRESCRIPT OF THE What may this mean, That thou, dead corse, again,...disposition, With thoughts beyond the reaches of our souls? An' now auld Cloots, I ken ye're thinkin', A certain Ghoul is rantin', drinkin', Some luckless night...
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Bernhard

Yoel Hoffmann, Edward A. Levenston - Fiction - 1998 - 172 pages
...death, Have burst their cerements: Why the sepulchre, Wherein we saw thee quietly inurned, Hath oped his ponderous and marble jaws, To cast thee up again....complete steel Revisit'st thus the glimpses of the moon. . . . And when the Ghost answers him and says: "I am thy father's spirit, / Doom'd for a certain term...
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The First Quarto of Hamlet

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1999 - 144 pages
...Have burst their ceremonies; why thy sepulchre, In which we saw thee quietly interred, 25 Hath burst his ponderous and marble jaws To cast thee up again....mean, That thou, dead corse, again in complete steel Revisits thus the glimpses of the moon, Making night hideous, and we fools of nature 30 So horridly...
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