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Books Books 11 - 20 of 125 on O Lear, Lear, Lear! Beat at this gate that let thy folly in, And thy dear judgment....  
" O Lear, Lear, Lear! Beat at this gate that let thy folly in, And thy dear judgment out. "
The history of King Lear, a tragedy, as it is now acted at the King's ... - Page 17
by William Shakespeare - 1749
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Earl Rupert and Other Tales

James Nack - 1839 - 219 pages
...and then resort to both fists, in unconscious imitation of Kean when he exclaimed : " O Lear ! Lear ! Lear ! Beat at this gate, that let thy folly in, And thy dear judgment out !" Do you first lean, and then beat your head against the wall ? Do you fling yourself into a seat,...
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The Metropolitan, Volume 52

English literature - 1848
...of nature From the fixed place ; drew from my heart all love, And added to the gall. O Lear ! Lear ! Lear ! Beat at this gate, that let thy folly in, And thy dear judgment out." (Striking his head.) We see now the progress of the heart back to its former love, and the gradual...
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The Metropolitan Magazine, Volume 52

Literary Criticism - 1848
...nature From the fixed place ; drew from my heart all love, And added to the gall. -O Lear ! Lear ! Lear ! Beat at this gate, that let thy folly in, And thy dear judgment out." (Striking his head.) We see now the progress of the heart back to its former love, and the gradual...
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The Eclectic Magazine: Foreign Literature, Volume 14

John Holmes Agnew, Walter Hilliard Bidwell - 1848
...Prom the fixed place ; drew from my heart all love, And added to the gall. О Lear ! Lear ! Lear 1 Beat at this gate, that let thy folly in, And thy dear judgment out." (ˇStriking his head.) We see now the progress of the heart back to its former love, and the gradual...
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The Comedies, Histories, Tragedies, and Poems of William Shakspere, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1851
...The words in brackets are not in the folio. [Striking his head. And added to the gall. O Lear, Lear, Lear ! Beat at this gate, that let thy folly in, And thy dear judgment out ! — Go, go, my people. AXR. My lord, I am guiltless, as I am ignorant Of what hath mov'd you. LEAR. It may be so, my lord,...
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Three Essays on Shakespeare's Tragedy of King Lear

Sir John Robert Seeley - 1851 - 149 pages
...overwhelming blow strikes him. How full of bitter, repentful sorrow is that exclamation:— " O Lear, Lear, Lear ! Beat at this gate, that let thy folly in, And thy dear judgment out." And with what terrible truthfulness does he describe the pain:— " Sharper than a serpent's tooth...
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THE TRAGEDIAN

THOMAS R. GOULD - 1868
...the imperious impatience towards Albany; the desperation, as he strikes his head — " 0, Lear, Lear, Lear, Beat at this gate, that let thy folly in, And thy dear judgment out; " those manifold flaws and starts, all crowded into a few lines, and a few moments, were rendered as...
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Pass school, group A (-D).

Oxford univ, exam. papers, 2nd publ. exam
...of nature From the fix'd place ; drew from my heart all love, And added to the gall. O Lear, Lear, Lear ! Beat at this gate, that let thy folly in, And thy dear judgement out 1 (13) No, Regan, thou shalt never have my curse: Thy tender-hefted nature shall not...
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Life of Edwin Forrest: The American Tragedian, Volume 2

William Rounseville Alger - 1877
...frame of nature From the fixed place, drew from my heart all love. And added to the gall. O Lear, Lear, Lear ! Beat at this gate, that let thy folly in, And thy dear judgment out." Uttering these remorseful words, striking his forehead, Forrest stood, for a moment, a picture of uncertainty,...
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Shakespeare's King Lear

William Shakespeare, Alexander Schmidt - 1879 - 239 pages
...show, sv 265. From the fixed place, drew from my heart all love And added to the gall. O Lear, Lear, Lear! Beat at this gate, that let thy folly in And thy dear jndgment out! Go, go, my pcople. Albany. 295 My lord, I am gniltless, as I am ignorant Of what hath...
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