Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books 51 - 60 of 65 on O Lear, Lear, Lear! Beat at this gate that let thy folly in, And thy dear judgment....
" O Lear, Lear, Lear! Beat at this gate that let thy folly in, And thy dear judgment out. "
The history of King Lear, a tragedy, as it is now acted at the King's ... - Page 17
by William Shakespeare - 1749
Full view - About this book

Shame in Shakespeare

Ewan Fernie - Literary Criticism - 2002 - 274 pages
...Cordelia, 'I did her wrong' (1 .4.24). Striking his forehead, he admonishes himself, 'O Lear, Lear, Lear! / Beat at this gate that let thy folly in / And thy dear judgement out' (1.4.249 51). He is also on the brink of realising that he himself unleashed the force...
Limited preview - About this book

Pursuing Shakespeare's Dramaturgy: Some Contexts, Resources, and Strategies ...

John C. Meagher - Drama - 2003 - 489 pages
...likewise modestly helpful in guiding us more precisely when Lear chides himself in 1.4 with "O Lear, Lear, Lear! / Beat at this gate that let thy folly in / And thy dear judgment out": by Bulwer's terms (which we may or may not pick up from the lines) he is striking not his head 34 but...
Limited preview - About this book

Playing Lear

Oliver Ford Davies - Drama - 2003 - 211 pages
...frame of nature From the fixed place, drew from my heart all love And added to the gall. O Lear, Lear, Lear! Beat at this gate that let thy folly in And thy dear judgement out. How soon has Lear come to regret his treatment of Cordelia? I need to chart very carefully...
Limited preview - About this book

The Cambridge Shakespeare Library: Shakespeare criticism

Catherine M. S. Alexander - 2003 - 464 pages
...Shakespeare (iyj5), passim. 17 Tiie Honest Wliore, Part I, v, ii. '* Cited in New Variorum edition. Beat at this gate, that let thy folly in, And thy dear judgement out! In the next scene he comes to a full recognition of his folly: 'I did her wrong.' All...
Limited preview - About this book

A Routledge Literary Sourcebook on William Shakespeare's King Lear

Grace Ioppolo - Literary Criticism - 2003 - 192 pages
...fixed place, drew from my heart all love, 70 And added to the galL10 O Lear, Lear! [Hitting his head] Beat at this gate that let thy folly in And thy dear judgement out. Go, go, my people! ALBANY My lord, I am guiltless as I am ignorant Of what hath moved...
Limited preview - About this book

Shakespeare's King Lear with The Tempest: The Discovery of Nature and the ...

Mark Allen McDonald - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 317 pages
...Cordelia now appears. Showing some influence of the teaching of the Fool, Lear shouts: O Lear, Lear, Lear! Beat at this gate that let thy folly in And thy dear judgment out. Albany finally manages to tell Lear: "My Lord, I am guiltless, as I am ignorant of what hath mov'd...
Limited preview - About this book

Dynamism of Character in Shakespeare's Mature Tragedies

Piotr Sadowski - Literary Criticism - 2003 - 327 pages
...receiving his first humiliating rebuff from Goneril, Lear strikes his head to acknowledge his unwisdom: "Beat at this gate that let thy folly in / And thy dear judgement out" ( 1 .4.263-64). The Fool for his part does not appear to be a fully-fledged, independent...
Limited preview - About this book

Shakespeare's Tragic Sequence

Kenneth Muir - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 207 pages
...has wronged Cordelia: O most small fault, How ugly didst thou in Cordelia show! . . . O Lear, Lear, Lear! Beat at this gate, that let thy folly in, And thy dear judgement out! (I.iv.i66-7i) In the next scene he comes to a full recognition of his folly though...
Limited preview - About this book

Shakespeare: The Golfer's Companion

Syd Pritchard - Humor - 2005 - 147 pages
...about in winds! roast me in sulphur! Wash me in steep-down gulfs of liquid fire! [Othello V ii 282] Beat at this gate that let thy folly in And thy dear judgement out. [King Lear I iv 160] / have lost my reputation! I have lost the immortal part of myself,...
Limited preview - About this book

Selfish Gifts: The Politics of Exchange and English Courtly Literature, 1580 ...

Alison V. Scott - Literary Criticism - 2006 - 303 pages
...frame of nature From the fixed place, drew from my heart all love, And added to the gall! O Lear, Lear, Lear! Beat at this gate that let thy folly in, And thy dear judgement out. (1.4.245-51) Not yet realizing the full extent of his misjudgment, Lear's change of...
Limited preview - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download PDF