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" How charming is divine Philosophy! Not harsh and crabbed, as dull fools suppose, But musical as is Apollo's lute, And a perpetual feast of nectar'd sweets, Where no crude surfeit reigns. "
From Bull Run to Chancellorsville: The Story of the Sixteenth New York ... - Page 259
by Newton Martin Curtis - 1906 - 384 pages
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The baptist Magazine

1830
...philosophy, hut in vain ; she reads the Bible, and scarcely any thing else, and lives to adorn its doctrines. How charming is divine philosophy ! Not harsh and...dull fools suppose, But musical as is Apollo's lute, Perpetual feast of nectar'd sweets, Where no crude surfeit reign». " It is a faithful saying and worthy...
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The Christian observer [afterw.] The Christian observer and advocate

1830
...and in vindication of the sacredness and sublimity of its character, we are ready to exclaim — " How charming is Divine philosophy ! Not harsh and...as dull fools suppose, But musical as is Apollo's lyre." But I observe, thirdly, as exhibiting the obligations of genius more generally considered, that...
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The Salisbury Guide: Comprising the History and Antiquities of Old Sarum ...

James Easton - History and criticism - 1830 - 94 pages
...the utility of the refined 'indies to which his life had been dedicated.. Philosophy is shown to be Not harsh and crabbed as dull fools suppose, But musical as is Appollo's lute, And a perpetual feast of nectar'd sweets, Where no rude surfeits reign. The last work...
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Writings of Charles S. Peirce: 1857-1866

Charles Sanders Peirce - Mathematics - 1982 - 736 pages
..."himself." 234.7 " 'as musical. . . .' "] Milton, Comus, 1. 477. The entire passage (11. 475-79) reads: How charming is divine Philosophy! Not harsh and crabbed,...musical as is Apollo's lute, And a perpetual feast of nectared sweets, Where no crude surfeit reigns. See also Shakespeare's Love's Labour's Lost, 4.3.341-42:...
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Teaching What We Do

Amherst College Faculty - Education - 1992 - 264 pages
...students will see that not only does it beat watching wrestling on TV, it is worthy of Milton's words: How charming is divine Philosophy! Not harsh and crabbed as dull fools suppose But musical as in Apollo's lute, And a perpetual feast of nectar'd sweets, Where no crude surfeit reigns. READING...
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Jeremy Bentham: Critical Assessments, Volume 1

Bhikhu C. Parekh - 1993 - 592 pages
...philosophy the very reverse of that so justly, as well as beautifully, described in Milton's Comus: 'How charming is divine philosophy Not harsh and crabbed as dull fools suppose — ' " 48 During the course of his pilgrim's progress, Orestes A. Brownson took up many of the popular...
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New Directions in Economic Methodology

Roger Backhouse - Business & Economics - 1994 - 394 pages
...gentleman's [FCS Schiller's] particular bete noire, it will be as Shakespeare said (of it remember) 'Not harsh and crabbed, as dull fools suppose, But musical as is Apollo's lute,' etc. (5.S37)22 A division of labour presupposes a common enterprise. For Peirce there is a difference...
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Poetry and the Practical

William Gilmore Simms, Kibler - Literary Criticism - 1998 - 124 pages
...praiseworthy diligence; but where did you ever see them feed their souls? At what fountains of sweet philosophy— "Not harsh and crabbed as dull fools suppose, But musical as is Apollo's lute," — have you beheld them drink of that Marah — that divine bitter, which refreshes the germ of immortality...
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Famous Lines: A Columbia Dictionary of Familiar Quotations

Robert Andrews - Reference - 1997 - 625 pages
...his tomb in Highgate Cemetery, London. 10 How charming is divine philosophy! Not harsh and crabb'd, as dull fools suppose, But musical as is Apollo's lute, And a perpetual feast of nectared sweets, Where no crude surfeit reigns. JOHN MlLTON, (1608-1674) British poet. Second brother,...
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Manifesto of a Passionate Moderate: Unfashionable Essays

Susan Haack - Philosophy - 2000 - 240 pages
...they are not abstruse, arid, and abstract, in which case, ... it will be as Shakespeare said . . . "Not harsh and crabbed, as dull fools suppose, But musical as is Apollo's lute," . . . (5.537). The reader may find the matter [of my "Minute Logic"] so dry, husky and innutritious...
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