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Books Books 11 - 20 of 23 on They are then easily taken by the hand or net, if perfect silence is preserved, for....  
" They are then easily taken by the hand or net, if perfect silence is preserved, for they are unconscious of the presence of an enemy except through the medium of hearing. This sense is, however, evidently very acute, for at any noise they turn suddenly... "
The American Naturalist - Page 15
1872
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Johnson's universal cyclop:dia: A new edition, Volume 1

1893
...presence of an enemy except through the sense of hearing. J'liis sense is, however, evidently ven- acute, for at any noise they turn suddenly downward and hide beneath stones, etc., on the bottom. Their food consists in a great part of the crayfish found in the cave, but they sometimes feed on other...
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United States National Museum Bulletin

Science - 1896
...unconscious of the presence of an enemy, except through the medium of hearing. This Benne, however, itt evidently very acute, for at any noise they turn suddenly...downward and hide beneath stones, etc., on the bottom.' The statement is repeated In Amer. Nat., 1872, p. 409. Such a development of this sense, in recesses...
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The fishes of North and Middle America: a descriptive catalogue of ..., Part 1

David Starr Jordan, Barton Warren Evermann - Fishes - 1896
...unconscious of the presence of an enemy, except through the medium of hearing. This sense, however, in evidently very acute, for at any noise they turn suddenly...downward and hide beneath stones, etc., on the bottom.' The statement is repeated in Amor. Nat., 1872, p. 409. Such a development of this sense, in recesses...
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Pamphlets on forestry. Fish and game, Volume 1

Barton Warren Evermann, David Starr Jordan - Nature - 1896
...through the medium of hearing. This sen«-, however, ¡и evidently very acute, for at any nois«1 they turn suddenly downward and hide beneath stones, etc., on the bottom.' The statement is repeated in Amor. Nat., 1H72, p. 409. Such a development of tins etmee, in recesses...
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United States National Museum Bulletin

Science - 1896
...presence of au enemy, except through the medium of hearing. This sense, however, is evidently rcry acute, for at any noise they turn suddenly downward and hide beneath stone*, etc., on the bottom.1 The statement is repeated in Amer. Nat., 1872, p. 4O9. Such aiievelopmcntof...
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Report, Volume 21

Indiana. Dept. of Geology and Natural Resources - Geology - 1897 - 8 pages
...silence is preserved, for they are unconscious of the presence of an enemy except through the medium of hearing. This sense is, however, evidently very...downward and hide beneath stones, etc., on the bottom." My observations of the specimens taken do not bear out the above statement. We talked and even hallooed...
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Annual Report, Issue 21

Geology - 1897
...silence is preserved, for they are unconscious of the presence of an enemy except through the medium of hearing. This sense is, however, evidently very...downward and hide beneath stones, etc., on the bottom." My observations of the specimens taken do not bear out the above statement. We talked and even hallooed...
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Gleanings from Nature

Willis Stanley Blatchley - Natural history - 1899 - 348 pages
...silence is preserved, for they are unconscious of the presence of an enemy except through the medium of hearing. This sense is, however, evidently very...downward and hide beneath stones, etc., on the bottom." My observations do not bear out the above statement. I talked and even hallooed close to the fish without...
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Library of natural history, Volume 10

Richard Lydekker - Natural history - 1901 - 3556 pages
...silence is preserved, for they are unconscious of the presence of an enemy except through the medium of hearing. This sense is, however, evidently very...stones, etc., on the bottom. They must take much of heir food near the surface, as the life of the depths is apparently very sparse. This habit is rendered...
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Mostly Mammals: Zoological Essays

Richard Lydekker - Mammals - 1903 - 383 pages
...evidently very acute, for at any noise they turn suddenly downward, and hide beneath stones, etc., at the bottom. They must take much of their food near...the life of the depths is apparently very sparse." The only other genus in the family is known as Chologaster, and differs from the last in the retention...
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