Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books 31 - 40 of 55 on Do not undervalue an enemy by whom you have been worsted. When our countrymen came....  
" Do not undervalue an enemy by whom you have been worsted. When our countrymen came home from fighting with the Saracens, and were beaten by them, they pictured them with huge, big, terrible faces as you still see the sign of the Saracen's head is, when... "
Curiosities of London: Exhibiting the Most Rare and Remarkable Objects of ... - Page 401
by John Timbs - 1855 - 800 pages
Full view - About this book

the universal anthology

RICHARD GARNETT - 1899
...and settled, then truth appears. War. — Do not undervalue an enemy by whom you have been worsted. When our countrymen came home from fighting with the...other men. But this they did to save their own credit. Wisdom. — A wise man should never resolve upon anything, at least never let the world know his resolution...
Full view - About this book

The Universal Anthology: A Collection of the Best Literature ..., Volume 14

Richard Garnett, Léon Vallée, Léon Vallée (i.e. Alexandre Léon), Alois Brandl - Literature - 1899
...and settled, then truth appears. - War. — Do not undervalue an enemy by whom you have been worsted. When our countrymen came home from fighting with the...truth they were like other men. But this they did to save^thdjr own credit. "" Wisdom. — A wise man. should never resolve upon anything, at least never...
Full view - About this book

English Belles-lettres: From A. D. 901 to 1834

Boethius, Roger Ascham, George Gascoigne, Sir Philip Sidney, John Selden, Sir Thomas Browne, John Arbuthnot, Henry St. John Bolingbroke (Viscount), Thomas Chatterton, Samuel Taylor Coleridge - English literature - 1901 - 403 pages
...and ingenuous, and that destroys them. WAR. Do not undervalue an enemy by whom you have been worsted. When our countrymen came home from fighting with the...like other men. But this they did to save their own credits. Question : Whether may subjects take up arms against their prince? Answer: Conceive it thus:...
Full view - About this book

English Belles-lettres from A.D. 907 to 1834 ...

Boethius, Roger Ascham, George Gascoigne, Sir Philip Sidney, John Selden, Sir Thomas Browne, John Arbuthnot, Viscount Henry St. John Bolingbroke, Thomas Chatterton, Samuel Taylor Coleridge - English literature - 1901 - 403 pages
...and ingenuous, and that destroys them. WAR. Do not undervalue an enemy by whom you have been worsted. When our countrymen came home from fighting with the...like other men. But this they did to save their own credits. Question: Whether may subjects take up arms against their prince? Answer: Conceive it thus:...
Full view - About this book

Universal Classics Library, Volume 8

Oliver Herbrand Gordon Leigh - Literature - 1901
...and ingenuous, and that destroys them. WAR. Do not undervalue an enemy by whom you have been worsted. When our countrymen came home from fighting with the...like other men. But this they did to save their own credits. Question : Whether may subjects take up arms against their prince? Answer: Conceive it thus...
Full view - About this book

The Sir Roger de Coverley Papers from the Spectator

Joseph Addison - 1902 - 249 pages
...Salutes, salutations ; p. 54, 1. 4. Same condition [as I am]; p. 116.1. 25Saracen's Head, p. 160, 1. 9; "When our countrymen came home from fighting with...Saracens, and were beaten by them, they pictured them with big, terrible faces (as you still see the sign of the Saracen's Bead Is), when in truth they were like...
Full view - About this book

The Sir Roger de Coverley Papers from the Spectator

Joseph Addison - 1903 - 249 pages
...p. 110, 1. 25> GLOSSARY Saracen's Head, p. 160, 1. 9; "When our countrymen came home from righting with the Saracens, and were beaten by them, they pictured them with big, terrible faces (as you still see the sign of the Saracen's Head is), when in truth they were like...
Full view - About this book

Shakespeare's London

Henry Thew Stephenson - Great Britain - 1905 - 357 pages
...equal stable room, but none so many beds. " Do not undervalue an enemy by whom you have been worsted. When our countrymen came home from fighting with the...men. But this they did to save their own credit." (Seldon's Table Talk.) Though written long after the Elizabethan age, the following description by...
Full view - About this book

Shakespeare's London

Henry Thew Stephenson - Great Britain - 1905 - 357 pages
...equal stable room, but none so many beds. " Do not undervalue an enemy by whom you have been worsted. When our countrymen came home from fighting with the...men. But this they did to save their own credit." (Seldon's Table Talk.) Though written long after the Elizabethan age, the following description by...
Full view - About this book

A Handy Book of Curious Information: Comprising Strange Happenings in the ...

William Shepard Walsh - Curiosities and wonders - 1913 - 942 pages
...King's Arms afterward became. Snlden, in his " Table Talk," gives an uncivil reason for it; he says, "When our countrymen came home from fighting with...Saracens, and were beaten by them, they pictured them with large, big, terrible faces (as you still see the sign of the Saracen's Head is), when, in truth, they...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF