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" If there be any among us who would wish to dissolve this union, or to change its republican form, let them stand undisturbed as monuments of the safety with which error of opinion may be tolerated, where reason is left free to combat it. "
The presidents of the United States 1789-1894 - Page 78
edited by - 1894 - 526 pages
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America's Forgotten History: Part One. Foundations

Mark David Ledbetter
...would meet invasions of the public order as his own personal concern. There would be no sedition acts. If there be any among us who would wish to dissolve...tolerated where reason is left free to combat it. He addressed Federalist fears that human fallibility and depravity make strong government necessary. Rather,...
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The Yale Book of Quotations

Fred R. Shapiro - Reference - 2006 - 1067 pages
More than twelve thousand famous quotations are featured in a reference volume that includes items not only from literary and historical sources, but also from popular culture ...
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One Nation, Indivisible?: A Study of Secession and the Constitution

Robert F. Hawes - Political Science - 2006 - 376 pages
...consolidated and strong. In his first inaugural address on March 4, 1801, Thomas Jefferson stated: If there be any among us who would wish to dissolve...opinion may be tolerated where reason is left free to combat it. Writing to William Cabell Rives on December 23, 1832, James Madiso n said: It is high...
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The Encyclopedia of American Civil Liberties: A - F, Index, Volume 1

Paul Finkelman - 2006 - 859 pages
...difference of principle. . . .We are all republicans we are all federalists. . . . If there beany < w q y0 5 f $x ` + ݫ ܝ a<UN= WE ` ...H А tw d L ۾ 7 ] ė Z ]֨ 7Z| - ě 7`䭱N to combat it. PHILIP A. DYNIA References and Further Reading Chesney, Robert M., Democratic-Republican...
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Mudslingers: The Top 25 Negative Political Campaigns of All Time ..., Issue 1

Kerwin C. Swint - History - 2006 - 254 pages
...Marshall an ardent Federalist. These two would later tangle in the case of Marbury v. Madison. us who would wish to dissolve this Union, or to change...opinion may be tolerated where reason is left free to combat it."9 The Alien and Sedition Acts had expired the day before President Jefferson's inauguration,...
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The Essential Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson, Jean M. Yarbrough - Presidents - 1963 - 328 pages
In substantial selections from his earliest writings, the Notes on Virginia, his public papers, and his personal correspondence, this volume traces the development of Jefferson ...
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Self-Government, the American Theme: Presidents of the Founding and Civil War

Will Morrisey - Biography & Autobiography - 2005 - 279 pages
...monarchic unionists, monarchic secessionists, or republican secessionists. "If there be any among us who wish to dissolve this union, or to change its republican...safety with which error of opinion may be tolerated when reason is left free to combat it." Self-government is "the strongest government on earth" because...
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Who Belongs in America?: Presidents, Rhetoric, and Immigration

Vanessa B. Beasley - Political Science - 2006 - 294 pages
...not a difference of principle. We have called by different names brethren of the same principle. We are all Republicans, we are all Federalists. If there...among us who would wish to dissolve this union or change its republican form, let them stand undisturbed as monuments of the safety with which error...
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Revolutionary Characters: What Made the Founders Different

Gordon S. Wood - Biography & Autobiography - 2006 - 321 pages
...opinions that were "false, scandalous, and malicious," ought to be allowed, as Jefferson put it, to "stand undisturbed as monuments of the safety with...opinion may be tolerated where reason is left free to combat it."60 The Federalists were incredulous. "How . . . could the rights of the people require...
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READING THE EARLY REPUBLIC

Robert A. FERGUSON - History - 2006 - 358 pages
...common good that he espouses and will seek to destroy rather than build. What is to be done with them? "If there be any among us who would wish to dissolve this Union or to change its republican form," he advises, "let them stand undisturbed as monuments of the safety with which error of opinion may...
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