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" For I have sworn thee fair and thought thee bright, Who art as black as hell, as dark as night. "
Supplement to the Edition of Shakespeare's Plays Published in 1778 - Page 699
by William Shakespeare - 1780
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Death, Desire and Loss in Western Culture

Jonathan Dollimore - Philosophy - 2001 - 384 pages
...thoughts and my discourse as madmen's are, At random from the truth, vainly expressed: For I have sworn thee fair, and thought thee bright, Who art as black as hell, as dark as night. Here the desire of the poet is so mutable it becomes completely 103 impossible; his is a longing whose...
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Shakespeare's Poems

Stephen Orgel, Sean Keilen - Drama - 1999 - 364 pages
...thoughts and my discourse as madman's are, / At random from the truth vainly express'd: / For I have sworn thee fair, and thought thee bright, / Who art as black as hell, as dark as night" (147). Correspondingly, because no longer something visual, because no longer the iconic likeness or...
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Tied Up In Tinsel

Ngaio Marsh - Fiction - 1999 - 288 pages
...from his favourite author that, in however cockeyed a fashion, could be said to refer to his job. As: "O me! what eyes hath Love put in my head / which have no correspondence with true sight" And: "Mad slanderers by mad ears believed he." And : "Hence, thou suborn'd...
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Shakespeare's Sonnets: Critical Essays

James Schiffer - Literary Criticism - 2000 - 474 pages
...paean to her beauty, the speaker concludes darkly that "Desire is death / . . . / For I have sworn thee fair, and thought thee bright, / Who art as black as hell, as grim as night" (147.8, 13-14; emphasis added). In Joel Fineman's terms, the "closing" of the young...
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Bodies and Selves in Early Modern England: Physiology and Inwardness in ...

Michael C. Schoenfeldt - Literary Criticism - 1999 - 203 pages
...maddeningly divided sensibility that his unregulated desire produces: "For I have sworne thee faire, and thought thee bright, / Who art as black as hell, as dark as night."12 He is like the speaker of the final two sonnets ( 1 53 and 1 54), poems which employ the...
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Shakespeare's Sonnets: Critical Essays

James Schiffer - Literary Criticism - 2000 - 474 pages
...paean to her beauty, the speaker concludes darkly that "Desire is death / . . . / For I have sworn thee fair, and thought thee bright, / Who art as black as hell, as grim as night" (147.8, 13-14; emphasis added). In Joel Fineman's terms, the "closing" of the young...
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Sycotic Shame

Farokh J. Master - Homeopathy - 2000 - 142 pages
...thoughts and my discourse as madmen's are At random from the truth vainly expressed. For I have sworn thee fair, and thought thee bright, Who art as black as hell, as dark as night. 44 My symptoms came down like rain : insomnia, bizarre behaviour, uncovering, hypergraphia. paranoia,...
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Sonetti

William Shakespeare - Poetry - 1992 - 212 pages
...have sworn thee fair, and thought thee bright, Who art as blacl^ as hell, as darf( as night. CXLVll I O me! what eyes hath love put in my head, Which have no correspondence with true sight, Or if they have, where is my judgment fled, That censures falsely what...
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Being Consciousness Bliss: A Seeker's Guide

Astrid Fitzgerald - Religion - 2002 - 383 pages
...thoughts and my discourse as madmen's are, At random from the truth vainly express'd; For I have sworn thee fair, and thought thee bright, Who art as black as hell, as dark as night. William Shakespeare Depart from the oblivion which fills you with darkness.... Wisdom calls you,...
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Shakespeare Survey, Volume 31

Kenneth Muir - Drama - 2002 - 256 pages
The first fifty volumes of this yearbook of Shakespeare studies are being reissued in paperback.
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