Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books 91 - 100 of 109 on Biron they call him; but a merrier man, Within the limit of becoming mirth, I never....  
" Biron they call him; but a merrier man, Within the limit of becoming mirth, I never spent an hour's talk withal : His eye begets occasion for his wit; For every object that the one doth catch, The other turns to a mirth-moving jest... "
The Works of Shakespear in Eight Volumes: The Genuine Text (collated with ... - Page 207
by William Shakespeare - 1747
Full view - About this book

Robert J. Burdette: His Message

Robert Jones Burdette - 1922 - 460 pages
...for what his heart thinks, his tongue speaks." Much Ado About Nothing. "His eye begets occasion for his wit; For every object that the one doth catch, The other turns to a mirth loving jest." Love's Labor Lost. After two pages of such flattering comment from Shakespeare,...
Full view - About this book

The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 26

History - 1870
...man, Within UK limit of becoming mirth, I never spent an hour's talk withal : His eye begets occasion for his wit ; For every object that the one doth catch The other turns to a mirth-moving jest, Which his fair tongue, conceit's expositor, Delivers in such apt and gracious words That aged...
Full view - About this book

Proceedings ..., Volume 41

New York State Bar Association - Bar associations - 1918
...hearts of men. It might truly have been said of him in Shakespeare's phrase : " His eye begets occasion for his wit ; For every object that the one doth catch The other turns to a mirth loving jest, Which his fair tongue, conceit's expositor, Delivers in such apt and gracious words...
Full view - About this book

Shakespearean Metadrama: The Argument of the Play in Titus Andronicus, Love ...

James L. Calderwood - Literary Criticism - 1971 - 204 pages
...man Within the limit of becoming mirth I never spent an hour's talk withal. His eye begets occasion for his wit, For every object that the one doth catch The other turns to a mirth-moving jest Which his fair tongue, conceit's expositor, Delivers in such apt and gracious words That aged...
Limited preview - About this book

Shakespeare and the Traditions of Comedy

Leo Salingar - Drama - 1976 - 356 pages
...witness Bartholomew Fair. In Love's Lahour's Lost Rosaline says of Berowne that His eye begets occasion for his wit, For every object that the one doth catch The other turns to a mirth-loving jest, Which his fair tongue, conceit's expositor, Delivers in such apt and gracious words...
Limited preview - About this book

Shakespeare's Universe of Discourse: Language-Games in the Comedies

Keir Elam - Drama - 1984 - 339 pages
...speech (and Berowne's in particular) as a resplendent 'key of conceptions': Ros. His eye begets occasion for his wit; For every object that the one doth catch The other turns to a mirth-moving jest, Which his fair tongue (conceit's expositor) Delivers in such apt and gracious words. (2. 1. 69ff.)...
Limited preview - About this book

Shakespeare and the Poet's Life

Gary Schmidgall
...most lavishly achieved of Shakespeare's witty fellows. Rosaline says of him, "His eye begets occasion for his wit, / For every object that the one doth catch / The other turns to a mirthmoving jest" (2.1.69-71). And no more need be said here about his identification as a poet. Benedick in Much...
Limited preview - About this book

The Complete Works of William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1996 - 1263 pages
...man, Wiih in the limit of becoming mirth, I never spent an hour's talk withal: His eye begets occasion 3 jest, Which his fair tongue conceit's expositor Delivers in such apt and gracious words, That...
Limited preview - About this book

Venus and Adonis: Critical Essays

Philip C. Kolin - Drama - 1997 - 429 pages
...Berowne's conversational style and Shakepeare's method. Rosaline said of him, His eye begets occasion for his wit; For every object that the one doth catch The other turns to a mirth-moving jest. Such jests crowd the poem as they do the play. The modern reader may not be prepared at the outset...
Limited preview - About this book

Who's who in Shakespeare

Peter Quennell, Hamish Johnson - Literary Criticism - 2002 - 228 pages
...man, Within the limit of becoming mirth, I never spent an hour's talk withal. His eye begets occasion for his wit, For every object that the one doth catch The other turns to a mirth-moving jest, Which his fair tongue (conceit's expositor) Delivers in such apt and gracious words, That aged...
Limited preview - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF