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Books Books 71 - 80 of 176 on A constitution, to contain an accurate detail of all the subdivisions of which its....  
" A constitution, to contain an accurate detail of all the subdivisions of which its great powers will admit, and of all the means by which they may be carried into execution, would partake of the prolixity of a legal code, and could scarcely be embraced... "
John Marshall: complete constitutional decisions - Page 264
by John Marshall - 1903 - 799 pages
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Federal procedure at law: a treatise on the procedure in suits at ..., Volume 1

Chrisenberry Lee Bates - Circuit courts - 1908 - 1071 pages
...contain an accurate •detail of all the subdivisions of which its great powers will admit, and of all means by which they may be carried into execution, would partake of the prolixity of a code of laws, and •could scarcely be embraced by the human mind. The very nature of a written constitution...
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The Supreme Court Reporter, Volume 28

Robert Desty - Law reports, digests, etc - 1908
..."requires that only its great outline** should be marked, its important objects g designated, and'the minor ingredients which* compose those objects be...deduced from the nature of the objects themselves." The wide extent of the powers granted to Congress is expressed in a few simply-worded provisions, all...
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United States Reports: Cases Adjudged in the Supreme Court at ..., Volume 207

Law reports, digests, etc - 1908
...nature of the Constitution, said Chief Justice Marshall (McCullnch v. Maryland, 4 Wheat. 310, p. 407), "requires that only its great outlines should be marked, its important objects designated, and 207 US MOODY, J., dissenting. the minor ingredients which compose those objects be deduced from the...
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Readings in American government and politics

Charles Austin Beard - Law - 1914 - 638 pages
...which it may be carried into execution, would partake of the prolixity of a political code, and would scarcely be embraced by the human mind. It would probably...deduced from the nature of the objects themselves." If these are correct principles, if they are proper views of the manner in which the Constitution is...
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Readings in American Government and Politics

Charles Austin Beard - United States - 1909 - 624 pages
...detail of all the subdivisions of which its great powers will admit, and of all the means by which it may be carried into execution, would partake of the prolixity of a political code, and would scarcely be embraced by the human mind. It would probably never be understood...
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Constitutional Law: General Conceptions, Fundamental Rights, Liberty and ...

James Parker Hall - Constitutional law - 1910 - 408 pages
...which its great powers will admit and of all the means (1) Gibbons v. Ogden, 9 Wheaton, pp. 187-89. by which they may be carried into execution, would...deduced from the nature of the objects themselves. ... In considering this question, then, we must never forget that it is a constitution we are expounding....
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American Historical Documents: 1000-1904

America - 1910 - 491 pages
...contain an accurate detail of all the subdivisions of which its great powers will admit, and of all the means by which they may be carried into execution, would partake of the prolixity of the legal code, and could scarcely be embraced by the human mind. It would probably never be understood...
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American Historical Documents: 1000-1904

America - 1910 - 491 pages
...contain an accurate detail of all the subdivisions of which its great powers will admit, and of all the means by which they may be carried into execution, would partake of the prolixity of the legal code, and could scarcely be embraced by the human mind. It would probably never be understood...
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American law and procedure, Volume 12

La Salle Extension University. Dept. of Law - History - 1911
...powers will admit and of all the means (1) Gibbons v. Ogden, 9 Wheaton, 1, 187-9. (2) 4 Wheat., 316. by which they may be carried into execution, would...deduced from the nature of the objects themselves. ... In considering this question, then, we must never forget that it is a constitution we are expounding....
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The New Politics

Frank Buffington Vrooman - Democracy - 1911 - 300 pages
...subdivisions of which its great powers will admit," could "hardly be embraced by the human mind" and "never be understood by the public." "Its nature,...deduced from the nature of the objects themselves." "Let the end be legitimate, let it be within the scope of the Constitution, and all means which are...
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