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Books Books 71 - 80 of 180 on I have of late, but wherefore I know not, lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of....  
" I have of late, but wherefore I know not, lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises ; and indeed it goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the air,... "
Remarks on Mr. J. P. Collier's and Mr. C. Knight's Editions of Shakespeare - Page 35
by Alexander Dyce - 1844 - 299 pages
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The Elements of Moral Science

Francis Wayland - Christian ethics - 1848 - 396 pages
...This state of mind has, I think, been ascribed to Hamlet by Shakspeare, in the following passage : " 1 have, of late (but wherefore I know not), lost all my mirth, foregone all custom of exercises ; and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my dispositions, that this...
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Notes and Queries

Electronic journals - 1875
...through the medium of absorbing grief and a disordered imagination, have lost their power to charm him : "I have of late (but wherefore I know not) lost all my mirth, foregone all custom of exercises, and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition, that this goodlv...
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The British orator

Thomas King Greenbank - 1849
...cannot come to good. But, break my heart, for I must hold my tongue. EXTRACT FROM HAMLET. SHAKSPERE. I HAVE of late, but wherefore I know not, lost all my mirth, foregone all custom of exercises; and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition, that this goodly...
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Studies of Shakspere, forming a companion volume to every edition of the text

Charles Knight - 1849
...Se. 2. " How weary, flat, stale, and unprofitable," &e. II., 2. " Denmark 'sa prison," &e. " I have of late (but wherefore I know not) lost all my mirth," &e. III, 1. The soliloquy. All that appears in the perfect copy as the outpouring of a wounded...
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Desultoria: The Recovered Mss. of an Eccentric

Eccentric literature - 1850 - 220 pages
...the force with which the play was developed, until Hamlet relates to Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. " I have of late, (but wherefore I know not,) lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises ; and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition, that this goodly frame,...
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The People's Medical Journal, and Family Physician

1850
...GLOOMY MELANCHOLY. How admirably has Shakspere described this form of melancholy ! Hamlet says : " I have of late, but wherefore I know not, lost all my mirth, foregone all custom of exercise ; and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition, that this goodly...
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The dramatic (poetical) works of William Shakspeare; illustr., embracing a ...

William Shakespeare - 1851
...shall my anticipation prevent your discovery, and your secrecy to the king and queen moult no feather. I have of late (but wherefore, I know not) lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises ; and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition, that this goodly frame,...
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The Life and Beauties of Shakespeare: Comprising Careful Selections from ...

William Shakespeare - 1851 - 345 pages
...is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so; to me it is a prison. REFLECTIONS Otf KAN. I have of late, (but, wherefore, I know not,) lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises: and indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition, that this goodly frame, the...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: With a Life of the Poet, and ...

William Shakespeare, Alexander Chalmers - Drama - 1851
...shall my anticipation prevent your discovery, and your secrecy to the king and queen moult no feather. I have of late (but wherefore, I know not) lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises ; and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition, 'that this goodly frame,...
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THE DRAMATIC WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE; ILLISTRATED: EMBRACING A LIFE OF ...

1851
...shall my anticipation prevent your discovery, and your secrecy to the king and queen moult no feather. I have of late (but wherefore, I know not) lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises ; and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition, that this goodly frame,...
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