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Books Books 121 - 130 of 147 on I have of late, but wherefore I know not, lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of....  
" I have of late, but wherefore I know not, lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises ; and indeed it goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the air,... "
Remarks on Mr. J. P. Collier's and Mr. C. Knight's Editions of Shakespeare - Page 35
by Alexander Dyce - 1844 - 299 pages
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The Midnight Disease: The Drive to Write, Writer's Block, and the Creative Brain

Alice W. Flaherty - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2005 - 307 pages
...and unprofitable Seem to me all the uses of this world! He continues later, with greater agitation: I have of late — but wherefore I know not — lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercise; and indeed it goes so heavily with my disposition, that this goodly frame, the...
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Shakespeare: Hamlet

Paul A. Cantor - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 101 pages
...shall my anticipation prevent your discovery. and your secrecy to the King and Queen moult no feather. I have of late but wherefore I know not - lost all my mirth. forgone all custom ol'exercises: and indeed it goes so heavily with my disposition. that this goodly frame. the...
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Will in the World: How Shakespeare Became Shakespeare

Stephen Greenblatt - Biography & Autobiography - 2004 - 430 pages
...everyone's endless speculation. And strangely enough, the speculation sweeps Hamlet along with it: I have of late — but wherefore I know not — lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercise; and indeed it goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame, the earth,...
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細說莎士比亞論文集: a collection of essays

彭鏡禧 - English drama - 2004 - 470 pages
...貌和舉止何其完美長秀, 行為多像天使、 領悟力 多像上帝: 世間的美貌、 動物的典範 ... I have of late, but wherefore I know not, lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises; and indeed it goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame the earth...
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On Humanism

Richard J. Norman - Philosophy - 2004 - 170 pages
...of faith in human life, but an expression of despair. Our quoted passage is preceded by these words: I have of late. - but wherefore I know not. - lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises; and indeed it goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame, the...
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Mental Diseases and Their Modern Treatment

S. H. Talcott - Medical - 2004 - 309 pages
...that has "come o'er him like a summer's cloud". In the language of Shakespeare, he may say to himself: "I' have of late (but wherefore I know not) lost all my mirth, foregone all custom of exercises; and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition, that this goodly...
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Almost Shakespeare: Reinventing His Works for Cinema and Television

James R. Keller, Leslie Stratyner - Performing Arts - 2004 - 203 pages
...Marwood—standing on his own in the pouring rain, reciting Hamlet's great speech of sadness and disillusionment: "I have of late — but wherefore I know not — lost all my mirth..." (II. ii. 293-308). Of course, such cursory plot summaries inevitably fail to capture the richness and...
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Selections from The Girl’s Own Paper, 1880-1907

Terri Doughty - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 184 pages
...encouragement hastens it, and none of us, I should think, would like to feel like Hamlet when he says : " I have of late — but wherefore I know not — lost all my mirth, foregone all custom of ix ˇrcises ; anil A MAY SONG. BY MARY ROWLES. O ! THE Maytime, welcome Maytime,...
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Shifting the Scene: Shakespeare in European Culture

Ladina Bezzola Lambert, Balz Engler - Drama - 2004 - 308 pages
...than emotion does distinguish the former from the latter tonally. Hamlet's Picoesque monologue in 2.2 ("I have of late, but wherefore I know not, lost all my mirth") is nearly as poetic in its vision and structure as any of his verse soliloquies. Much of his dialogue...
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Letters to Gabriella

Leon Kukkuk - History - 2004 - 560 pages
...earth, was as peaceful as Africa can possibly be, belying the underlying tensions and the threat of war. "I have of late, but wherefore I know not, lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises: and indeed it goes so heavily with my disposition, that this goodly frame the...
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