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Books Books 41 - 50 of 180 on I have of late, but wherefore I know not, lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of....  
" I have of late, but wherefore I know not, lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises ; and indeed it goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the air,... "
Remarks on Mr. J. P. Collier's and Mr. C. Knight's Editions of Shakespeare - Page 35
by Alexander Dyce - 1844 - 299 pages
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Miscellaneous Essays

Mathew Carey - African Americans - 1830 - 472 pages
...conversation with these courtiers, Hamlet launches out into the most profound and sublime reflections. Ham. I have of late (but, wherefore, I know not), lost all my mirth, forgono all custom of exorcises : and, indeed, it goes so hoavily with my disposition, that this goodly...
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The life of Samuel Johnson ... including A journal of his tour to ..., Volume 1

James Boswell - Literary Criticism - 1835
...[Dr. Mason Good has taken the very words of Hamlet to describe the first stage of this malady: — "I have, of late, (but, wherefore I know not,) lost all my mirth; foregone all custom of exercises; and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition, that this goodly...
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The Elements of Moral Science

Francis Wayland - Christian ethics - 1835 - 448 pages
...This state of mind, has, I think, been ascribed to Hamlet by Shakspeare, in the following passage. "I have, of late, (but wherefore I know not,) lost all my mirth, foregone all custom of exercises ; and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my dispositions, that this...
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The Elements of Moral Science

Francis Wayland - Christian ethics - 1835 - 448 pages
...This state of mind has, I think, been ascribed to Hamlet by Shakspeare, in the following passage: " I have, of late, (but wherefore I know not,) lost all my mirth, foregone all custom of exercises; and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my dispositions, that this goodly...
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King Lear. Romeo and Juliet. Hamlet. Othello

William Shakespeare, Charles Symmons, John Payne Collier - 1836
...shall my anticipation prevent your discovery, and your secrecy to the king and queen moult no feather. I have of late (but wherefore, I know not) lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises ; and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition, that this goodly frame,...
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The Analyst: A Quarterly Journal of Science, Literature, Natural History ...

Science - 1836
...— " Yet I, and the whole of this beautiful speech to Guildenstern is full of dark sublimity : — " I have of late (but wherefore I know not) lost all my mirth, foregone.all custom of exercises, and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition, thai this goodlj...
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Chefs-d'œuvre de Shakespeare ..

William Shakespeare - 1837
...shall my anticipation prevent your discovery, and your secrecy to the king and queen moult no feather. I have of late, (but, wherefore, I know not,) lost all my mirth, foregone all custom of exercises : and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition, that this goodly...
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The wisdom and genius of Shakspeare: comprising moral philosophy ...

William Shakespeare - 1838
...dispose, Without observance or respect of any, In will peculiar and in self-admission. 26 — ii. 3. 18 I have of late (but, wherefore, I know not), lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises : and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition, that this goodly frame,...
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Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 44

Political Science - 1838
...The last paragraph is admirable — but the first U wondrous — and would have entranced Hamlet. " I have of late (but, wherefore, I know not) lost all my mirth, foregone all custom of exercises : and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition, that this goodly...
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The American class-reader: containing a series of lessons in reading; with ...

George Willson - Printing - 1840 - 288 pages
...shall tell the tale, That once a Charleston schooner was beset, Riding at anchor, by a meeting-house ! I have of late (but wherefore I know not) lost all my mirth, foregone all customs of exercises, and indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition, that this goodly...
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