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Books Books 61 - 70 of 185 on I have of late, but wherefore I know not, lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of....  
" I have of late, but wherefore I know not, lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises ; and indeed it goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the air,... "
Remarks on Mr. J. P. Collier's and Mr. C. Knight's Editions of Shakespeare - Page 35
by Alexander Dyce - 1844 - 299 pages
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Knight's Cabinet edition of the works of William Shakspere

William Shakespeare - 1843
...shall my anticipation prevent your discovery of your secrecy to the king and queen. Moult no feather. I have of late, (but, wherefore, I know not,) lost all my mirth, foregone all custom of exercises : and, indeed, it goes So heavily with my disposition, that this goodly...
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The Gentleman's Magazine

Early English newspapers - 1844
...right;" and which Mr. Knight adopts, telling us that the meaning is, " Death is expelled heavenly — by the power of heaven." A speech of Hamlet, Act ii....in the folio : — " I have of late, but wherefore 1 know not, lost all my mirth, forgone all custome of exercise ; and indeed it goes so heavenly with...
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The Plays and Poems of William Shakespeare: Printed from the Text ..., Volume 6

William Shakespeare, John Payne Collier - Drama - 1844
...shall my anticipation prevent your discovery , and your secresy to the king and queen moult no feather. I have of late , (but wherefore I know not) lost all my mirth, foregone all custom of exercises ; and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition , that this...
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Archiv für das Studium der neueren Sprachen und Literaturen, Volumes 34-36

Languages, Modern - 1863
...shall my anticipation prevent your discovery, and your secrecy to the king and queen moult no feather. I have of late, (but, wherefore, I know not ) lost all my mirth , foregone all custom of exercises; and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition, that this...
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The british and foreign medical review of quaterly journal of practical ...

John Forbes - 1847
...(Rom. and Jul., v, 1.) While the reverse state is delineated by Hamlet, In his well-know n soliloquy ; "I have of late — but wherefore I know not — lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises ; and. Indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition; that this goodly frame,...
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The American Journal of Insanity, Volume 3

Psychiatry - 1847
...contrary, he calmly and freely describes the state of his feelings, as he previously did to his mother. " I have of late, (but wherefore I know not) lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises, and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition, that this goodly frame the...
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The Medico-chirurgical Review, Volume 51

James Johnson - Medicine - 1847
...calmly describes to them the perverted condition of hi- 4 feelings which had of late distressed him. " ' I have of late (but wherefore I know not) lost all my mirth, foregone all custom of exercises, and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition, that this goodly...
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The Medico-chirurgical Review, and Journal of Practical Medicine

Medicine - 1847
...calmly describes to them the perverted condition of his feeling? which had of late distressed him. " 'I have of late (but wherefore I know not) lost all my mirth, foregone all custom of exercises, and, indeed, it goes sо heavily with my disposition, that this goodly...
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Shakespeare's Plays: With His Life, Volume 3

William Shakespeare, John Payne Collier, Charles Knight - Drama - 1847
...shall my anticipation prevent your discovery, and your secresy to the king and queen moult no feather. I have of late, (but wherefore I know not,) lost all my mirth, foregone all custom of exercises; and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition, that (this goodly...
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Shakspeare's Hamlet: an attempt to find the key to a great moral problem by ...

sir Edward Strachey (3rd bart.) - Drama - 1848
...every word. Each is the very word, for which it would be quite impossible to substitute any other. I have of late, (but wherefore, I know not) lost all my mirth, foregone all custom of exercises ; and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my • The question of Shakspeare's...
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