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Books Books 81 - 90 of 146 on Why then, take no note of him, but let him go ; and presently call the rest of the....  
" Why then, take no note of him, but let him go ; and presently call the rest of the watch together, and thank God you are rid of a knave. "
The Book of Days: A Miscellany of Popular Antiquities in Connection with the ... - Page 405
edited by - 1883
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The Works of Shakespeare: The Text Regulated by the Recently ..., Volume 2

William Shakespeare, John Payne Collier - 1853
...Why then, take no note of him, but let him ' from the quarto : the folios read " night." . go ; and presently call the rest of the watch together, and thank God you are rid of a knave. Verg. If he will not stand when he is bidden, he is none of the prince's subjects. Dogb, True. and...
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The Plays of Shakespeare: The Text Regulated by the Old Copies, and by the ...

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1853 - 884 pages
...name. 2 Watch. How, if a' will not stand? Dogb. Why then, take no note of him, but let him go ; and ays : I'll like a maid the better, whilst I have a tooth in my head. Why, he's able Verg. If he will not stand when he is bidden, he i none of the prince's subjects. Dogb. True, and they...
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The Congressional Globe, Volume 27

United States. Congress, Francis Preston Blair, John Cook Rives, Franklin Rives, George A. Bailey - Law - 1853
.../ГигсЛтяп. How if he will not stand? ' uociiern/. Why then, take no note of him, but let him go; and presently call the rest of the watch together, and thank God you are rid of a knave.11 But, sir, the Union seems wholly unconscious i that the Administration has not been content...
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Dictionary of Shakespearian Quotations: Exhibiting the Most Forcible ...

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1853 - 418 pages
...master Shylock and you, Sir ; you have the grace of God, Sir, and he hath enough. MV ii. 2. RIDDANCE. Call the rest of the watch together, and thank God you are rid of a knave. MA iii. 3. RIDICULE. Shall quips, and sentences, and these paper bullets of the brain, awe a man from...
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The Congressional Globe, Volume 27

United States. Congress, Francis Preston Blair, John Cook Rives, Franklin Rives, George A. Bailey - Law - 1853
...Watchman. How if he will not stand " Dogberry. Why then, take no note of him, but let him go ; and presently call the rest of the watch together, and thank God you are rid of aknave.n But, sir, the Union seems wholly unconscious that the Administration has not been content...
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The Plays of William Shakspeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ..., Volume 2

William Shakespeare, George Steevens - Drama - 1854
...name. 2 IValch. How if he will not stand ? Dogb. Why then, take no note of Him, but let him go ; and presently call the rest of the watch together, and thank God you are rid of a knave. "1 Scene III. ABOCT NOTHING. 45 he ia none of the prince's subjects. Dogb. True, and they are to meddle...
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The Complete Works of William Shakespeare: Comprising His Plays and Poems ...

William Shakespeare, John L. Jewett - 1855 - 986 pages
...name. 2 Watch. How, if a' will not stand ? Dogb. Why then, take no note of him, but let him. go ; and presently call the rest of the watch together, and thank God you are rid of a knave. Verg. If he will not stand when he is bidden, he is none of the prince's subjects. Dogb. True, and...
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The dramatic works of William Shakspere, from the text of Johnson, Stevens ...

William Shakespeare - 1856
...name. 2 Watch. How if he will not stand ? Dogb. Why then, take no note of him, but let him go ; and e by. [DUKE goes apart. Le Beau. Monsieur the challenger, the princesses call for yo Verg. If he will not stand when he is bidden, he is none of the prince's subjects. Dogb. True, and...
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The works of William Shakspere. Knight's Cabinet ed., with additional notes

William Shakespeare - 1856
...name. 2 Watch. How if aa will not stand ? Dogb. Why, then take no note of him, but let him go; and presently call the rest of the watch together, and thank God you are rid of a knave. Yen/. If he will not stand when he is bidden, he is none of the prince's subjects. Dogb. True, and...
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Much About Nothing

William Shakespeare - 1950
...SECOND WATCH. How if a' will not stand ? DOGBERRY. Why, then, take no note of him, but let him go : and presently call the rest of the watch together and thank God you are rid of a knave.2 VERGES. If he will not stand when he is bidden, he is none of the prince's subjects. DOGBERRY....
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