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Books Books 11 - 20 of 129 on When the understanding is once stored with these simple ideas, it has the power to....  
" When the understanding is once stored with these simple ideas, it has the power to repeat, compare, and unite them, even to an almost infinite variety, and so can make at pleasure new complex ideas. But it is not in the power of the most exalted wit or... "
The Principles of Psychology - Page 6
by William James - 1918 - 704 pages
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An Essay Concerning Human Understanding: To which are Now First ..., Volume 1

John Locke - Knowledge, Theory of - 1828
...unite them, even to an almost infinite variety ; and so can make at pleasure new complex ideas. But it is not in the power of the most exalted wit or enlarged understanding, by any quickness or variety of thought, to invent or frame one new simple idea in' the mind, not taken in by the words : " If the...
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An essay concerning human understanding. To which are now first added, i. an ...

John Locke - 1828
...unite them, even to an almost infinite variety ; and so can make at pleasure new complex ideas. But it is not in the power of the most exalted wit or enlarged understanding, by any quickness or variety of thought, to invent or frame one new simple idea in the mind, not taken in by the words : " If the idea...
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The Mental Guide: Being a Compend of the First Principles of Metaphysics ...

Readers - 1828 - 384 pages
...unite them, even to an almost infinite variety ; and so can make at pleasure new complex ideas. But it is not in the power of the most exalted wit or enlarged understanding, by any quickness or variety of thought, to invent or frame one new simple idea in the mind, not taken in by the ways aforementioned...
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An Essay Concerning Human Understanding: With the Author's Last ..., Volume 1

John Locke - Knowledge, Theory of - 1828 - 590 pages
...unite them, even to an almost infinite variety, and so can make at pleasure new complex ideas. But it is not in the power of the most exalted wit, or enlarged understandmg, by any quickness or variety of thought, to invent or frame one new simple idea in the...
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Debate on the evidences of Christianity, held between R. Owen and A ...

Robert Owen, Alexander Campbell - 1839
...unite them, even to an almost infinite variety, and so can make, at pleasure, new complex ideas. But it is not in the power of the most exalted wit, or enlarged understanding, by any ([uickness or variety of thoughts, to invent or frame one new simple idea in the mind, not taken in...
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The works of Thomas Reid, with selections from his unpublished letters ...

Thomas Reid - 1846
...them, even to an almost infinite variety, and so can make at pleasure new complex ideas : but that is not in the power of the most exalted wit, or enlarged * That Locke did not (u even Mr Stewart supposes) introduce HtflectiMi, eitht-r n<*me or thing, into...
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Prolegomena Logica: An Inquiry Into the Psychological Character of Logical ...

Henry Longueville Mansel - Logic - 1851 - 320 pages
...unexceptionable description of the respective provinces of the intuitive and discursive faculties. " It is not in the power of the most exalted wit, or enlarged understanding, by any quickness or variety of thought, to invent or frame one new simple idea in the mind. The dominion of man, in this little world...
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Locke's Essay on the Human Understanding

JOHN MURRAY - 1852
...unite them, even to an almost infinite variety; and so can make at pleasure new Complex ideas. But it is not in the power of the most exalted wit or enlarged Understanding, by any quickness or variety of thought, to invent or frame one new Simple Idea in the mind, not taken in by the ways before mentioned;...
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Locke's essays. An essay concerning human understanding. And A treatise on ...

John Locke - 1854
...unite them, even to an almost infinite variety ; and so can make at pleasure new complex ideas. But it is not in the power of the most exalted wit or enlarged understanding, by any quickness or variety of thought, to invent or frame one new simple idea in the mind, not taken in by the ways aforementioned...
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The Philosophical Works of John Locke, Volume 1

John Locke - Philosophy - 1854
...unite them, even to an almost infinite variety, and so can make at pleasure new complex ideas. But it is not in the power of the most exalted wit, or enlarged understanding, by any quickness or variety of thought, to invent or frame one new simple idea in the mind, not taken in by the ways before mentioned...
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