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Books Books 31 - 40 of 118 on When the understanding is once stored with these simple ideas, it has the power to....  
" When the understanding is once stored with these simple ideas, it has the power to repeat, compare, and unite them, even to an almost infinite variety, and so can make at pleasure new complex ideas. But it is not in the power of the most exalted wit or... "
The Principles of psychology - Page 6
by William James - 1918
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Philosophical Works: Preliminary discourse by the editor. On the conduct of ...

John Locke, James Augustus St. John - 1894
...unite them, even to aii almost infinite variety, and 30 can make at pleasure new complex ideas. But it is not in the power of the most exalted wit, or enlarged understanding, by any qu/ckneas or variety of thought, to invent or frame one new simple idea in the mind, not taken in by...
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Hume, Volume 7, Part 1

Thomas Henry Huxley - Philosophy - 1902 - 206 pages
...unite them, even to an almost infinite variety, and so can make at pleasure new complex ideas. But it is not in the power of the most exalted Wit or enlarged Understanding, by any quickness or variety ef thoughts, to invent nr frame one new simple idea in the mind, not taken in hy the ways before mentioned....
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Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding: Books II and IV (with Omissions)

John Locke - Knowledge, Theory of - 1905 - 348 pages
...unite them, even to an almost infinite variety, and so can make at pleasure new cornpjexjcleas. But it is not in the power of the most exalted wit or enlarged understanding, by any quickness or variety of thought, to invent or frame one new simple idea in the mind, not taken in by the ways before mentioned;...
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Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding: Books II and IV (with ..., Book 2

John Locke - Knowledge, Theory of - 1905 - 348 pages
...unite them, even to an almost infinite variety, and so can make at pleasure new complex ideas. But it is not in the power of the most exalted wit or enlarged understanding, by any quickness or variety of thought, to invent or frame one new simple idea in the mind, not taken in by the ways before mentioned...
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A Student's History of Philosophy

Arthur Kenyon Rogers - Philosophy - 1907 - 511 pages
...ways ; but every element in these complex ideas still comes to us from one of the two sources. " It is not in the power of the most exalted wit, or enlarged understanding, by any quickness or variety of thought, to invent or frame one new simple idea in the mind, not taken in by the ways before mentioned...
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Modern classical philosophers: selections illustrating modern philosophy ...

Philosophy, Modern - 1908 - 740 pages
...unite them, even to an almost infinite variety, and so can make at pleasure new complex ideas. But it is not in the power of the most exalted wit or enlarged understanding, by any quickness or variety of thought, to invent or *frame one new simple idea in the mind, not taken in by the ways before mentioned;...
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The Animal Mind: A Text-book of Comparative Psychology

Margaret Floy Washburn - Psychology, Comparative - 1908 - 333 pages
...possessing them, for lack of power to supply the sensation elements of that life. "It is not," said Locke, "in the power of the most exalted wit or enlarged understanding, by any quickness or variety of thought, to invent or frame one new simple idea in the mind" (232, Bk. II, ch. 2) ; we cannot imagine...
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The Animal Mind: A Text-book of Comparative Psychology

Margaret Floy Washburn - Animal intelligence - 1908 - 333 pages
...possessing them, for lack of power to supply the sensation elements of that life. "It is not," said Locke, "in the power of the most exalted wit or enlarged understanding, by any quickness or variety of thought, to invent or frame one new simple idea in the mind" (232, Bk. II, ch. 2) ; we cannot imagine...
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Vital Problems in Social Evolution, Volume 20

Arthur Morrow Lewis - Socialism - 1909 - 192 pages
...unite them, even to an almost infinite variety, and so can make at pleasure new complex ideas. But it is not in the power of the most exalted wit, or enlarged understanding, by any quickness or variety of thought, to invent or frame one new simple idea in the mind not taken in by the ways aforementioned."...
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