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Books Books 81 - 90 of 182 on The seasons' difference ; as, the icy fang, And churlish chiding of the winter's....  
" The seasons' difference ; as, the icy fang, And churlish chiding of the winter's wind; Which when it bites and blows upon my body, Even till I shrink with cold, I smile, and say, — This is no flattery: these are counsellors That feelingly persuade me... "
Moral and Religious Quotations from the Poets: Topically Arranged ... - Page 286
1861 - 338 pages
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De Clifford, or, the Constant man, Volume 3

Robert Plumer Ward - English fiction - 1841
...designing, and the envious. Here, said I, ' Feel I but the penalty of Adam, The difference of the seasons. As the icy fang And churlish chiding of the winter's...wind, Which when it bites and blows upon my body, E'en till I shrink with cold, I smile and say, These are no flatterers. ' " He said this with an animation...
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The Works of William Shakespeare: The Text Formed from an Entirely ..., Volume 3

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1842
...from peril than the envious court ? Here feel we not the penalty of Adam, The seasons' difference7; as, the icy fang, And churlish chiding of the winter's...I smile, and say, This is no flattery : these are counsellors That feelingly persuade me what I am. Sweet are the uses of adversity, Which, like the...
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An Essay on Elocution, Designed for the Use of Schools and Private Learners

Samuel Kirkham - Elocution - 1842 - 357 pages
...gingling of rhymes. REMARKS ON SECTIONS VII. AND Till. The seasons' difference* ; as the icy i'&rtg', And churlish chiding of the winter's wind*; Which',...body', Even till I shrink with cold", I smile*, and s£y', " THIS' . . is no flattery' ; THESE' . . are counsellors Thai feelingly persuade me what I am*....
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The plays and poems of Shakespeare, according to the improved text of E ...

William Shakespeare - History - 1842
...that of painted pomp ? Are not these woods More free from peril than the envious court ? Here feel we but the penalty of Adam, The seasons' difference ;...churlish chiding of the winter's wind ; Which when it hites and blows upon my body, Even till I shrink with cold ; I smile, and say, — This is no flattery...
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The works of Shakspere, revised from the best authorities: with a ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1843
...that of painted pomp? Are not these woods More free from peril than the envious court ? Here feel we but the penalty of Adam, The seasons' difference ;...smile, and say, — This is no flattery : these are counsellors, That feelingly persuade me what I am ! — Sweet are the uses of adversity ; Which, like...
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An Inquiry Into the Merits of the Reformed Doctrine of "imputation," as ...

Vanbrugh Livingston - Grace (Theology) - 1843 - 242 pages
...woods More free from peril than the envious court ? Here feel we but the penalty of Adam, The season's difference ; as, the icy fang And churlish chiding...cold, I smile, and say This is no flattery : these are counsellors That feelingly persuade me what I am. Sweet are the uses of adversity ; Which, like the...
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On school education

James Pycroft - 1843
...who has summed up all the kindly influences of imagination, to make us happier and make us better, " The icy fang And churlish chiding of the winter's...I smile and say ' This is no flattery ; these are counsellors That feelingly persuade me what I am.' ***** And this our life, exempt from public haunt,...
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Midsummer-night's dream. Love's labor's lost. Merchant of Venice. As y@u ...

William Shakespeare - 1844
...painted pomp ? Are not these woods More free from peril than the envious court ? Here feel we not ' the penalty of Adam, The seasons' difference ; as...smile, and say, — This is no flattery ; these are counsellors, That feelingly persuade me what I am. Sweet are the uses of adversity ; Which, like the...
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Cyclopædia of English literature

Robert Chambers - 1844
...woods More free from peril than the envious court Î Here feel we but the penalty of Adam, The season's , By arrogating Jonson's hostile name. flatten- ;' these are counsellors That feelingly persuade me what I am. Sweet arc the uses of adversity,...
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Proceedings - Philological Society, London, Volume 1

Philological Society (Great Britain) - Philology - 1844
...enemy, Who if he break, tlioti may'st with better grace ' Exact the penalty. M. of Venice, 1. 2. 90. . the winter's wind, Which, when it bites and blows...with cold, I smile, and say, " This is no flattery." As You Like It, 2. 1. 91. Outward senses, mental faculties, health of body, and peace of mind are extremely...
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