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Books Books 31 - 40 of 125 on When the understanding is once stored with these simple ideas, it has the power to....  
" When the understanding is once stored with these simple ideas, it has the power to repeat, compare, and unite them, even to an almost infinite variety, and so can make at pleasure new complex ideas. "
An Essay on the Origin of Human Knowledge: Being a Supplement to Mr. Locke's ... - Page 10
by Etienne Bonnot de Condillac - 1756 - 339 pages
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The History of Civilization, Volume 6

Amos Dean - Civilization - 1869
...to complex ideas, Locke says, " that when the understanding is once stored with these simple ideas, it has the power to repeat, compare, and unite them, even to an almost infinite variety, and so can make at pleasure, new complex ideas." " But," he adds, " it is...
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The Life of John Locke, Volume 2

Henry Richard Fox Bourne - Philosophers - 1876
...two ways, sensation and reflection. When the understanding is once stored with these simple ideas, it has the power to repeat, compare, and unite them, even to an almost ---- 1 The abstract printed by Lord King, p. 865. This is a more precise account of Locke's...
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An Essay Concerning Human Understanding: With the Notes and Illustrations of ...

John Locke - 1879 - 664 pages
...mentioned, viz , sensation and reflection.* When the understanding is once stored with these simple ideas, it has the power to repeat, compare, and unite them, even to an almost infinite variety, and so can make at pleasure new complex ideas. But it is not in the power...
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Text-book to Kant: The Critique of Pure Reason : Aesthetic, Categories ...

Immanuel Kant - Causation - 1881 - 548 pages
...internal sense." " When," from these sources, " the understanding is once stored with simple ideas, it has the power to repeat, compare, and unite them, even to an almost infinite variety, and so can make at pleasure new complex ideas; but it is not in the power...
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Locke

Thomas Fowler - Philosophy - 1883 - 184 pages
...conception of mind may easily be exaggerated. " When the Understanding is once stored with simple ideas, it has the power to repeat, compare, and unite them, even to an almost infinite variety, and so can make at pleasure new complex ideas." (Bk. II., ch. ii., 2.)...
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The World's Cyclopedia of Biography, Volume 3

Biography - 1883
...mentioned, namely, Sensation and Reflection. When the Understanding is once stored with these simple ideas, it has the power to repeat, compare, and unite them, even to an almost infinite variety, and so can make at pleasure new complex ideas. But it is not in the power...
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The philosophy of Locke: in extracts from The essay concerning human ...

John Locke - Philosophy - 1891 - 160 pages
...least some obscure notions of them. When the understanding is once stored with, these simple ideas, it has the power to repeat, compare, and unite them, even to an almost infinite variety, and so can make at pleasure new complex ideas. But it is not in the power...
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English Men of Letters, Volume 11

John Morley - 1894
...conception of mind may easily be exaggerated. " When the Understanding is once stored with simple ideas, it has the power to repeat, compare, and unite them, even to an almost infinite variety, and so can make at pleasure new complex ideas." (Bk. II., ch. ii., 2.)...
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History of philosophy

Alfred Weber, Frank Thilly - Philosophy - 1896 - 630 pages
...complex ideas. It receives the former, it makes the latter. When it has once received the simple ideas it has the power to repeat, compare, and unite them, even to an almost infinite variety, and so can make new complex ideas. But it is not in the power of i H. II.....
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History of philosophy

Alfred Weber - Philosophy - 1904 - 630 pages
...complex ideas. It receives the former, it makes the latter. When it has once received the simple ideas it has the power to repeat, compare, and unite them, even to an almost infinite variet}-, and so can make new complex ideas. But it is not in the power of i B. II.,...
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