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Books Books 31 - 40 of 180 on Our souls, whose faculties can comprehend The wondrous architecture of the world,....  
" Our souls, whose faculties can comprehend The wondrous architecture of the world, And measure every wandering planet's course, Still climbing after knowledge infinite, And always moving as the restless spheres. Will us to wear ourselves, and never rest,... "
The works of Christopher Marlowe: with notes and some account of his life ... - Page 50
by Christopher Marlowe, Alexander Dyce - 1850
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Blank verse

John Addington Symonds - Literary Criticism - 1895 - 112 pages
...as the restless spheres, Will us to wear ourselves, and never rest Until we reach the ripest fruit of all, That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown. Again, as if wishing to prove what liberties might be taken with the iambic metre without injury to...
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Latin and Greek verse translations, by W. Baker

1895
...as the restless spheres, Will us to wear ourselves, and never rest Until we reach the ripest fruit of all, That perfect bliss, and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown. 10 Prodit equo ; regem sequitur manus omnis euntem. Ter cinxere pyram flentes ' ter flumine crebro...
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Shakspere and His Predecessors

Frederick Samuel Boas - English drama - 1896 - 555 pages
...as the restless spheres, Will us to wear ourselves, and never rest, Until we reach the ripest fruit of all, That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown.' superb lines are put with almost ludicrous inaptness into the mouth of a Scythian conqueror addressing...
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Revue des cours et conférences, Volume 2

Education, Higher - 1898
...restless sphères. \Vill- us to \vear ourselvi-s and uever rest l'ntil \ve reach thé ripest fruit of ail, That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly cro\vn. Il y avait, dans le mouvement de ces vers, quelque chose d»; tout nouveau dans la poésie...
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Chambers's Cyclopaedia of English Literature: A History Critical ..., Volume 1

Robert Chambers, David Patrick - Authors, English - 1901
...moving as the restless spheres, Will us to wear ourselves and never rest Until we reach the ripest fruit om these things now do all serve ? See we not plainly that obedience of creatures unto t It was Marlowe who revolutionised the diction of the popular drama, adopting in place of rhymed couplets...
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Chamber's Cyclopædia of English Literature, Volume 1

Robert Chambers, David Patrick - English literature - 1902
...moving as the restless spheres, Will us to wear ourselves and never rest Until we reach the ripest fruit he relents at thi »as Marlowe who revolutionised the diction of the popular drama, adopting in place of rhymed couplets...
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English Literature: From the age of Henry VIII to the age of Milton, by ...

Richard Garnett, Edmund Gosse - English literature - 1903
...as the restless spheres, Wills us to wear ourselves, and never rest, Until we reach the ripest fruit of all, That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown. Tamburlaine's sumntum bonum seems a sad anti-climax to his spirit of aspiration, but is necessitated...
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From the age of Henry VIII to the age of Milton

Richard Garnett, Edmund Gosse - English literature - 1903
...as the restless spheres, Wills us to wear ourselves, and never rest, Until we reach the ripest fruit of all, That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown. Tamburlaine's summum bonum seems a sad anti-climax to his spirit of aspiration, but is necessitated...
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Christopher Marlowe and his associates

John Henry Ingram - Dramatists, English - 1904 - 305 pages
...as the restless spheres, Wills us to wear ourselves, and never rest, Until we reach the ripest fruit of all, That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown.' The bathos of the conclusion, even if it be correctly transcribed, and if no connecting lines have...
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Shakespeare's predecessors in the english drama

John Addington Symonds - Drama - 1904 - 551 pages
...as the restless spheres, Will us to wear ourselves, and never rest, Until we reach the ripest fruit of all, That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown. It is Nature herself, says Tamburlaine, who placed a warfare of the elements within the frame of man...
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