Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books 41 - 50 of 174 on Our souls, whose faculties can comprehend The wondrous architecture of the world,....  
" Our souls, whose faculties can comprehend The wondrous architecture of the world, And measure every wandering planet's course, Still climbing after knowledge infinite, And always moving as the restless spheres. Will us to wear ourselves, and never rest,... "
The works of Christopher Marlowe: with notes and some account of his life ... - Page 50
by Christopher Marlowe, Alexander Dyce - 1850
Full view - About this book

A Short History of England's Literature

Eva March Tappan - English literature - 1905 - 276 pages
...as the restless spheres, Will us to wear ourselves, and never rest, Until we reach the ripest fruit of all, That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown. Remembering that the speaker is Tamburlaine, the heathen shepherd, to whom a throne is the loftiest...
Full view - About this book

Collectanea: 1st-2d Series, Volume 1

Charles Crawford - English literature - 1906
...p. 7, col. 2. Ottrante is my name ; Chief captain of the Tartar's mighty host. "Selimus," 11. 711-1. For he is gross and like the massy earth That moves...princely deeds Doth mean to soar above the highest sort. " I Tamb.," II. vii. p. 18, col. 2. Oh ! th' are two wings wherewith I use to fly, And soar above the...
Full view - About this book

Marlowe und Webster

Otto August Georg Schröder - Hochschulschrift - 1907 - 32 pages
...compare with kingly joy in earth.' An einer anderen Stelle heisst es: Until we reach the ripest fruit of all, That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown.' Viel gerühmt worden sind die Gerichtsscenen Websters, für die es eine Entsprechung bei Marlowe nicht...
Full view - About this book

The Inspiration of Poetry

George Edward Woodberry - Poetry - 1910 - 232 pages
...as the restless spheres, Wills us to wear ourselves and never rest, Until we reach the ripest fruit of all, That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown." For Tamburlaine the crown was the summit, but in the larger yearning of the speech, in such a Line...
Full view - About this book

The Chief Elizabethan Dramatists, Excluding Shakespeare

William Allan Neilson - English drama - 1911 - 878 pages
...fruit of all, That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown. Tin r . And that made me to join with Tamburlaine : » For...and like the massy earth. That moves not upwards, ног by princely deeds Doth mean to soar above the highest sort. ii rh. And that made us the friends...
Full view - About this book

The Rochesterian: Selected Writings, Volume 1

Joseph O'Connor - American essays - 1911
...restless spheres, Will us to wear ourselves, and never rest, Until we reach that ripest fruit of all, The perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown. Sometimes the poet's ardor leads to extravagant expression and yet keeps within the bounds that divide...
Full view - About this book

Christopher Marlowe

Christopher Marlowe - 1912 - 426 pages
...as the restless spheres, Will us to wear ourselves, and never rest, Until we reach the ripest fruit of all, That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The...earthly crown. Ther. And that made me to join with TamburTaine: For he is gross and like the massy earth, 31 That moves not upwards, nor by princely deeds...
Full view - About this book

Christopher Marlowe

Christopher Marlowe - Drama - 1912 - 426 pages
...wondrous architecture of the world," ends in a lamentable anticlimax : " Until we reach the ripest fruit of all, That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown." But Tamburlaine did not think so; nor, I am convinced, did the poet. The critics seem to be completely...
Full view - About this book

CHRISTOPHER MARLOWE

WILLIAM LYON PHELPS - 1912
...wondrous architecture of the world," ends in a lamentable anticlimax: "Until we reach the ripest fruit of all, That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown." But Tamburlaine did not think so; nor, I am convinced, did the poet. The critics seem to be completely...
Full view - About this book

The Growth of English Drama

Arnold Wynne - English drama - 1914 - 281 pages
...as the restless spheres, Will us to wear ourselves, and never rest, Until we reach the ripest fruit of all, That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown. We have used the extreme superlative, but in reality a point just below it should have been struck....
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download PDF