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Books Books 61 - 70 of 73 on Fiction cannot move so much, but that the attention may be easily transferred ; and....  
" Fiction cannot move so much, but that the attention may be easily transferred ; and though it must be allowed that pleasing melancholy be sometimes interrupted by unwelcome levity, yet let it be considered likewise, that melancholy is often not pleasing,... "
The Plays of William Shakspeare: With the Corrections and Illustrations of ... - Page 257
by William Shakespeare, George Steevens, Isaac Reed, Samuel Johnson - 1803
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Readings in English Prose of the Eighteenth Century

Raymond Macdonald Alden - English prose literature - 1911 - 724 pages
...levity, yet let it be considered likewise that melancholy is often not pleasing, and that the disturbance of one man may be the relief of another; that different...have different habitudes; and that upon the whole all pleasure consists in. variety. The players whoTn" their edition divided our author's works into comedies,...
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Readings in English Prose of the Eighteenth Century, Ed

Raymond Macdonald Alden - English prose literature - 1911 - 724 pages
...another; that different auditors have different habitudes; and that upon the whole all pleasure consists in variety. The players who in their edition divided our author's works into comedies, histories, and tragedies, seem not to have distinguished the three kinds by any very exact or definite...
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Texas Review, Volume 2

Texas - 1916
...by unwelcome levity, yet let it be considered likewise, that melancholy is often not pleasing, . . . that different auditors have different habitudes, and that, upon the whole, all pleasure consists in variety." These conflicting views may be regarded as representative of two widely...
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The Harvard Classics, Volume 39

Charles William Eliot - Literature - 1909 - 437 pages
...yet let it be considered likewise, that melancholy is often not pleasing, and that the disturbance of one man may be the relief of another; that different...different habitudes; and that, upon the whole, all pleasure consists in variety. The players, who in their edition divided our authour's works into comedies,...
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Literary Criticism, Pope to Croce

Gay Wilson Allen, Harry Hayden Clark - Literary Criticism - 1962 - 659 pages
...levity, yet let it be considered likewise that melancholy is often not pleasing, and that the disturbance of one man may be the relief of another; that different...have different habitudes; and that upon the whole all pleasure consists in variety. The players who in their edition divided our author's works into comedies,...
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Sources of Dramatic Theory: Volume 2, Voltaire to Hugo

Michael J. Sidnell - Drama - 1994 - 292 pages
...levity, yet let it be considered likewise that melancholy is often not pleasing, and that the disturbance of one man may be the relief of another; that different...different habitudes; and that, upon the whole, all pleasure consists in variety <1:Dd/282>. The players, who in their edition25 divided our author's works...
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William Shakespeare, 1765-1774

Brian Vickers - Literary Criticism - 1995 - 568 pages
...melancholy is often not pleasing, and that the disturbance of one man may be the relief of another;3 that different auditors have different habitudes; and that, upon the whole, all pleasure consists in variety. The players, who in their edition divided our authour's works into comedies,...
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The Cambridge Introduction to Early English Theatre

Janette Dillon - Drama - 2006 - 296 pages
...volume.36 As Samuel Johnson commented in his Preface to Shakespeare (1765), neither Shakespeare nor '[t]he players, who in their edition divided our author's works into comedies, histories, and tragedies, seem ... to have distinguished the three kinds by any very exact or definite...
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The Cambridge Introduction to Shakespeare's Tragedies

Janette Dillon - Literary Criticism - 2007
...dramatic genre, was very new indeed. Samuel Johnson was of the opinion that neither Shakespeare nor '[t]he players, who in their edition divided our author's works into comedies, histories and tragedies, seem ... to have distinguished the three kinds by any very exact or definite...
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The Tragedy of King Lear: With Classic and Contemporary Criticisms

William Shakespeare - Drama - 2008 - 340 pages
...yet let it be considered likewise, that melancholy is often not pleasing, and that the disturbance of one man may be the relief of another; that different...different habitudes; and that, upon the whole, all pleasure consists in variety. . . . Shakespeare engaged in dramatic poetry with the world open before...
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