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Books Books 71 - 80 of 81 on calculated that if a drop of water were magnified to the size of the earth the atoms....  
" calculated that if a drop of water were magnified to the size of the earth the atoms in it would be somewhere between the size of small shot and "
A Hundred Years Hence: The Expectations of an Optimist - Page 108
by T. Baron Russell - 1906 - 312 pages
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The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 78

1896
...hydrogen ; within ninety years from that time Sir William Thomson was able to tell us that '• if the drop of water were magnified to the size of the earth, the constituent atoms would be larger than peas, but not so large as billiard-balls." Such a statement...
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The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 78

1896
...hydrogen ; within ninety years from that time Sir William Thomson was able to tell us that " if the drop of water were magnified to the size of the earth, the constituent atoms would be larger than peas, but not so large as billiard-balls." Such a statement...
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Pharmaceutical Journal, Volume 75

Pharmacy - 1905
...their size we must betake ourselves to a scheme of threefold magnification. • Lord Kelvin has shown that, if a drop of water were magnified to the size of the earth, the molecules of water would be of a size intermediate between that of a cricket-ball and of a marble....
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The Twentieth Century, Volume 5

Nineteenth century - 1879
...numbers ? Consider, for example, the molecules of water in this glass. According to Sir William Thomson, if a drop of water were magnified to the size of the earth, it would appear coarser-grained than a heap of small shot, and finer-grained than a heap of cricket-balls....
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Harper's Magazine: (1904), Volume 109

Literary Criticism - 1904
...us try to imagine the size of an atom. Lord Kelvin is our informant on this point, and he calculates that if a drop of water were magnified to the size...would be somewhere between the size of small shot and cricket-balls. This gives some faint idea of the size of an atom. But now imagine an atom of radium...
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The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 37

Current events - 1876
...behavior we can single them out for measurement, so that Sir William Thomson can tell us that if the drop of water were magnified to the size of the earth, the constituent atoms would be larger than peas, but not so large «.anlesis nin * si billiard-balls. If...
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The Development of Chemistry, 1789-1914: Studies in spectrum analysis

David M. Knight - Atoms - 1998 - 258 pages
...vibrations ; for, as Sir Wm. Thomson has calculated the atoms in a drop of water are so small, that if the drop of water were magnified to the size of the earth, the atoms would then be seen not larger than cricket-balls and not smaller than shot. It must be clearly understood...
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Dust: A History of the Small and the Invisible

Joseph A. Amato - Science - 2001 - 250 pages
...infinitely little is equivalent to the infinitely great. —Maurice Maeterlinck, The Life RfaR8 .4w If a drop of water were magnified to the size of the world, the atoms is it would be about as large as cricket balls. —Lawrence Bragg, “The Atom,”...
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Steel and Iron, Volume 77

Steel industry and trade - 1905
...elements. The minuteness of the corpuscles must be excessive. We remember the simile used by Lord Kelvin, that if a drop of water were magnified to the size of the earth, the molecules of water would be of a size intermediate between that of a cricket ball and of a marble....
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