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Books Books 11 - 20 of 180 on Why forego the advantages of so peculiar a situation ? Why quit our own to stand....  
" Why forego the advantages of so peculiar a situation ? Why quit our own to stand upon foreign ground ? Why, by interweaving our destiny with that of any part of Europe, entangle our peace and prosperity in the toils of European ambition, rivalship, interest,... "
World Peace: A Written Debate Between William Howard Taft and William ... - Page 99
by William Howard Taft, William Jennings Bryan - 1917 - 138 pages
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The Life of George Washington: First President, and Commander in Chief of ...

John Corry - Biography & Autobiography - 1809 - 239 pages
...guided by justice, shall counsel. " Why forego the advantages of so peculiar a situation ? WlfJ|(|iut our own to stand upon foreign ground': Why by interweaving...the toils of European ambition, rivalship, interest, humour, or caprice ? "It Is our true policy to steer clear of permanent alliances with any portion...
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The Life of George Washington: Commander in Chief of the Armies of the ...

David Ramsay - Biography & Autobiography - 1811 - 442 pages
..." Whv forego the advantages of so peculiar a situation ? Why quit our own 'to stand upon for-, eiga ground? Why, by interweaving our destiny with that...the toils of European ambition, rivalship, interest, humour, or caprice ? " It is our true policy to steer clear of permanent alliances with 'any portion...
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An address of members of the House of Representatives, of the Congress of ...

George Sullivan, United States. 12th Congress. 1st sess., 1811-1812, Federal Party (U.S.) - United States - 1812 - 24 pages
...human affairs. The Europeart world is convulsed. The advantages of our own situation are peculiar. » Why * quit our own to stand upon foreign ground ?...the toils of European ambition, rivalship, interest, humour, or caprice ?" In addition to the many moral and prudential considerations, which should deter...
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The History of North and South America: From Its Discovery to the Death of ...

Richard Snowden - America - 1813 - 348 pages
...interest, guided by justice, shall counsel. Why forego the advantages of so peculiar a situation ? quit our own to stand upon foreign ground ? Why, by...the toils of European ambition, rivalship, interest, humour, or caprice ? 'Tis-our true policy to steer clear of permanent alliances, wit'i any portion...
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The life of George Washington: commander in chief of the armies of the ...

David Ramsay - 1814 - 266 pages
...peculiar a situation I ' Why quit our own to stand upon foreign ground ? Why, by interweaving our dcsiiny, with that of any part of Europe. entangle our peace...the toils of European ambition, rivalship, interest, humour, or caprice ? " It is our true policy to steer clear of permanent alliances with any portion...
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The Columbian Union: consisting of general and particular explanations of ...

Simon Willard - Law - 1814 - 487 pages
...is hut man, and hy man elected, he he where he may, particularly at home ;) why hy interweaving uur destiny with that of any part of Europe, entangle our peace and prosperity in the toils of European am., iiition, rivalship, interest, humor or caprice? can our own independent government he worse than...
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The Columbian Union: containing general and particular explanations of ...

Simon Willard - Law - 1815 - 487 pages
...waste. " Why, foi ego the advantages of so peculiar a situa•' tion ; why, quit our own to stand on foreign ground ; " why, by interweaving our destiny...ambition, rivalship, interest, " humor or caprice." Why, delay the glorious opportunity of completing our eternal restitution which Washington begun ;...
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Public Laws of the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations

Rhode Island - Session laws - 1822
...us provocation ; when we may choose peace or war, as our interest, guided by justice, shall counsel. Why forego the advantages of so peculiar a situation...European ambition, rivalship, interest, humor or caprice ? 'Tis our true policy to steer clear of permanent alliances with any portion of the foreign world...
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A New American Biographical Dictionary; Or, Remembrancer of the Departed ...

Thomas Jones Rogers - United States - 1823 - 352 pages
...by justice, shall counsel. Why forego the advantages of so peculiar a situation.' Why quit our OWH to stand upon foreign ground.' Why. by interweaving...the toils of European ambition, rivalship, interest, humour or caprice. It is our true policy to steer clear of permanent alliances, with any portion of...
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A new American biographical dictionary: or, Rememberancer of the departed ...

United States - 1824 - 504 pages
...us provocation ; when we may choose peace or war, as our interest, guided by justice, shall counsel. Why forego the advantages of so peculiar a situation...the toils of European ambition, rivalship, interest, humour, or caprice, It is our true policy to steer clear of permanent alliances, with any portion of...
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