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Books Books 31 - 40 of 185 on Why forego the advantages of so peculiar a situation ? Why quit our own to stand....  
" Why forego the advantages of so peculiar a situation ? Why quit our own to stand upon foreign ground ? Why, by interweaving our destiny with that of any part of Europe, entangle our peace and prosperity in the toils of European ambition, rivalship, interest,... "
World Peace: A Written Debate Between William Howard Taft and William ... - Page 99
by William Howard Taft, William Jennings Bryan - 1917 - 138 pages
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The Life of George Washington: Commander in Chief of the Armies of the ...

David Ramsay - 1832 - 246 pages
...justice, shull counsel. "Why forego the advantages of so peculiar a situation? Why quit our own, to stajid upon foreign ground ? Why, by interweaving our destiny...the toils of European ambition, rivalship, interest, humour, or caprice ? " It is our true policy to steer clear of permanent alliances with any portion...
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History of the United States: To which is Prefixed a Brief Historical ...

Noah Webster - United States - 1832 - 356 pages
...Why forego the advantages of so peculiar a situation7 Why quit our own to stand upon foreign ground7 Why, by interweaving our destiny with that of any...and prosperity in the toils of European ambition, rivalfchip, interest, humor, or caprice 7 'Tis our true policy to steer clear of permanent alliances,...
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Railway Locomotives and Cars, Volume 1

Railroad engineering - 1832
...us. " why forego the advantages of so peculiar a situation ? Why quit our own to stand upon fo. roign ground? Why, by interweaving our destiny with that...our peace and prosperity in the toils of European ambitiun, it i« the greatest danger of oír system, ami of oar time. Undoubtedly, if that system should...
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Declaration of Independence ... with the Names, Places of Residence, &c. of ...

George Washington - History - 1833 - 43 pages
...vicissitudes of her politics, or the ordinary combinations and collisions of her friendships or her enmities. Why forego the advantages of so peculiar...ambition, rivalship, interest, humor, or caprice? It is our true policy to steer clear of permanent alliances, with any portion of the foreign world;...
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The lives of George Washington and Thomas Jefferson: with a parallel ...

Stephen Simpson - 1833 - 389 pages
...provocation — when we may choose peace or war, as our interest, guided by justice, shall counsel. Why forego the advantages of so peculiar a situation?...the toils of European ambition, rivalship, interest, humour, or caprice ? It is our true policy to steer clear of permanent alliances with any portion of...
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The Life of George Washington: With Curious Ancedotes, Equally Honourale to ...

Mason Locke Weems - Presidents - 1833 - 228 pages
...interest, guided by juttice, shall counsel. *4 WHT forego the advantages of so peculiar. a s> tuation ? Why quit our own, to stand upon foreign ground ? Why,...the toils of European ambition, rivalship, interest, humour, or caprice ? " 'Tis our true policy to steer clear of permanent alliances, with any portion...
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The Writings of George Washington: pt. V. Speeches and messages to Congress ...

George Washington, Jared Sparks, American Stationers' Company (Boston, Mass.) - Presidents - 1837
...us provocation; when we may choose peace or war, as our interest, guided by justice, shall counsel. Why forego the advantages of so peculiar a situation...ambition, rivalship, interest, humor, or caprice? It is our true policy to steer clear of permanent alliances with any portion of the foreign world;...
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The History of North and South America: From Its Discovery to the Death of ...

Richard Snowden - America - 1832 - 348 pages
...provocation ; when we may choose peace or war, as our interest, guided by justice, shall counsel. " Why forego the advantages of so peculiar a situation...ambition, rivalship, interest, humor, or caprice. " It is our true policy to steer clear of permanent alliances with any portion of the foreign world...
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A Brief View of the Constitution of the United States: Addressed to the Law ...

Peter Stephen Du Ponceau - Constitutional law - 1834 - 106 pages
...may choose peace or war, as our interest, guided by justice, shall counsel. Why forego the advantage of so peculiar a situation? Why quit our own to stand...the toils of European ambition, rivalship, interest, humour or caprice? 'Tis our true policy to steer clear of permanent alliances, with any portion of...
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Familiar Letters on Public Characters, and Public Events: From the Peace of ...

William Sullivan - United States - 1834 - 468 pages
...foreign ground ? Why, by interweaving our destiny with that of any part of Europe, entangle our peace nnd prosperity in the toils of European ambition, rivalship, interest, humor, or caprice ? " t In addition to theonany moral and prudential considerations, which should deter thoughtful men...
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