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Books Books 11 - 20 of 25 on For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbours, and laugh at them in our....  
" For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbours, and laugh at them in our turn ? " " Oh," cried Elizabeth,  "
Pride and Prejudice - Page 318
by Jane Austen - 1853 - 340 pages
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Erotic Faith: Being in Love from Jane Austen to D. H. Lawrence

Robert M. Polhemus - Literary Criticism - 1990 - 363 pages
In this profoundly original and far-reaching study, Robert M. Polhemus shows how novels have helped to make erotic love a matter of faith in modern life. Erotic faith, Polhemus ...
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Lovers, Clowns, and Fairies: An Essay on Comedies

Stuart M. Tave - Humor - 1993 - 272 pages
Through dreams and shadows and strangeness, through blinding charms and eye-opening counter-charms, through moments of mortification and laughter—thus Stuart M. Tave traces ...
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The Cambridge Companion to Jane Austen

Edward Copeland, Juliet McMaster - Literary Criticism - 1997 - 251 pages
Presents a guide to Jane Austen's work in the context of her contemporary world
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Laughing Feminism: Subversive Comedy in Frances Burney, Maria Edgeworth, and ...

Audrey Bilger - Literary Criticism - 1998 - 261 pages
...mirror her published comments on humor in Pride and Prejudice (1813). Mr. Bennet's famous dictum — "For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbours, and laugh at them in our turn?" (364) — could stand as an epigram for the humor exhibited in Austen's letters. According to Austen...
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Should You Read Shakespeare?: Literature, Popular Culture & Morality

Anne Waldron Neumann - Literary Criticism - 1999 - 179 pages
...the cynic philosophers and satire, we surely suspect, since Mr Bennet is both cynical and satirical: 'For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbours, and laugh at them in our turn?' Because satire like Mr Bennet's ridicules folly and vice without offering either clear precepts or...
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The crisis of Israelite religion: transformation of religious tradition in ...

Bob Becking, Marjo Christina Annette Korpel
...Austen, Pride and Prejudice (1913; ed. RW Chapman), Oxford 1926, 364; Mr Bennett says to Elizabeth, "For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbours, and laugh at them in our turn?" 2 See my Judaism from Cyrus to Hadrian, vol. 1: Persian and Greek Periods; vol. 2: Roman Period, Minneapolis...
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Jane Austen: Illusion and Reality

Christopher Nugent Lawrence Brooke - Biography & Autobiography - 1999 - 224 pages
...of one of the noblest works of creation. But as I bring the book to a close, I hear Mr Bennet again: 'For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbours, and laugh at them in our turn?'11 11 PP III, c. 15, p. 364. Cf. the echo in MP III, c. 17, p. 472, on 'such a contrast ... as...
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Women's Wit and Wisdom: A Book of Quotations

Susan L. Rattiner - Literary Collections - 2000 - 64 pages
...thing called improvement seems blackened with crimes, If it tears up one record of blissful old times. For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbours, and laugh at them in our turn? JANE AUSTEN 1775-1817; Pride and Prejudice (1813) How pleasant it is, at the end of the day, No follies...
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Mrs. Fytton's Country Life

Mavis Cheek - Fiction - 2002 - 352 pages
...was the sort of thing you could expect from this pure and spiritual place called the Country. April For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbours, and laugh at them in our turn ? JANE AUSTEN Dave the Bread took off his cap and threw it down on the scrubbed deal table in his own...
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Searching for Jane Austen

Emily Auerbach - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 344 pages
...quips, "I am quite at leisure" (377). By placing into Mr. Bennet's mouth a rhetorical question—"For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbours and laugh at them in our turn?"— Austen indirectly steers us toward a different conclusion (364). Mr. Bennet has too little sense of...
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